Pennsylvania Photographer Matthew Christopher Shares Images From his Book Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences

Pennsylvania photographer Matthew Christopher discusses his new book, Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences, and its documentation of the country’s abandoned factories, theaters, churches, and prisons in hauntingly beautiful pictures  and words.
Thursday, July 16, 2015
Program: 
6:30 pm
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RSVP Required

Matthew Christopher has spent the past decade documenting the ruins of one of the greatest civilizations the world has known: our own. The Pennsylvania photographer catalogues abandoned structures in pictures and words, lending a haunting beauty to factories, theaters, churches, and prisons now vacant and left to the elements and vandals. They are places that once helped define communities’ identities.

Christopher, who features the images in his new book, Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences, discusses his work and its underlying importance. “I am dismayed,” he says, “at the prevailing blindness … that prizes a handful of nails or pottery fragments from an early colonial settlement but ignores sites that are still above ground and critical to preserving the accounts of accomplishments and missteps over the last century.”

Thu, 07/02/2015
Courtney Lewis,816.701.3669
Pennsylvania Photographer Matthew Christopher<br> Shares Images From his Book <em>Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences</em>

(Kansas City, Missouri) - Matthew Christopher has spent the past decade documenting the ruins of one of the greatest civilizations the world has known: our own.

The Pennsylvania photographer catalogues abandoned structures in pictures and words, lending a haunting beauty to factories, theaters, churches, and prisons now vacant and left to the elements and vandals. They are places that once helped define communities' identities.

Christopher, who features the images in his new book, Abandoned America: The Age of Consequences, discusses his work and its underlying importance on Thursday, July 16, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

"I am dismayed," he says, "at the prevailing blindness ... that prizes a handful of nails or pottery fragments from an early colonial settlement but ignores sites that are still above ground and critical to preserving the accounts of accomplishments and missteps over the last century."

Admission is free. RSVP at kclibrary.org or call 816.701.3407.

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