UMKC's Julie Urbanik Discusses the Role of Animals in Kansas City's Past, Present, and Future

Julie Urbanik, local geographer, looks at how animals – cattle, horses, mules, and even the zoo’s popular polar bears – have long been central to Kansas City’s identity and landscape.
Tuesday, July 21, 2015
Program: 
6:30 pm
RSVP Required

From its earliest days as a fur-trading outpost to its heyday as a livestock center and current configuration as a city of pet lovers and barbecue aficionados, animals have been central to Kansas City’s identity and landscape. In fact, KC can more accurately be described as a “zoopolis,” a multi-species urban location, than a standard metropolis.

Local geographer Julie Urbanik lends new a new way of looking at our city, examining the web of past and present connections between its human and animal inhabitants and recasting the traditional, human-centric stories that portray people as the only principals. In essence, she says, Kansas City would not be Kansas City without its animals – cattle, horses, mules, and even the zoo’s popular polar bears, Nikita and Berlin.

Tue, 07/07/2015
Courtney Lewis,816.701.3669
UMKC's Julie Urbanik Discusses the Role of Animals<br> In Kansas City's Past, Present, and Future

(Kansas City, Missouri) - From its earliest days as a fur-trading outpost to its heyday as a livestock center and current configuration as a city of pet lovers and barbecue aficionados, animals have been central to Kansas City's identity and landscape. In fact, KC might more accurately be described as a "zoopolis," a multi-species urban location, than a standard metropolis.

Julie Urbanik, a former associate professor of geosciences at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, lends a new way of looking at our city, examining the web of past and present connections between its human and non-human inhabitants on Tuesday, July 21, 2015, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

In essence, she argues, Kansas City would not be Kansas City without its animals - cattle, horses, mules, and even the zoo's popular polar bears, Nikita and Berlin. Admission is free. RSVP at kclibrary.org or call 816.701.3407.

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