Previous Special Events

Friday, October 17, 2014

The 2014 Kansas City Digital Inclusion Summit will provide a forum to share and discuss digital inclusion efforts and needs in Kansas City and exchange best practices and trends in the field of work that includes digital and online information literacy, broadband adoption, low-cost technology, economic and workforce development and public access to information technology.


Thursday, October 16, 2014

He grew up in a Philadelphia housing project, the son of an alcoholic, largely absent father and a loving but overworked mother. A high school dropout, he turned his life around in the Navy, made his way into college, and caught a few early breaks as a standup comedian. From there, Bill Cosby went on to become a national treasure.

Mark Whitaker, the former editor of Newsweek and later a senior executive with NBC News and CNN Worldwide, discusses his newly released biography of the now 77-year-old creator and star of television’s The Cosby Show. Cosby not only towers as a groundbreaking comedian, producer, and actor but also as an author, educator, and social activist. Whitaker delves, too, into his setbacks and personal dramas, from an affair that sparked public scandal to the murder of his only son.


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

It’s easy to think of World War I as a European war, but fierce fighting all over the Middle East brought about great changes on socio-economic, cultural, and political levels. Kristian Coates Ulrichsen explores the lasting impact of the Great War on the region’s political geography in The First World War in the Middle East, and shows how national identities were formed as the Ottoman Empire disintegrated.

Kristian Coates Ulrichsen is a Research Fellow at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy in Houston and an Associate Fellow at Chatham House in London.

Co-presented by the Kansas City Public Library and the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial.


Tuesday, October 14, 2014
6:30pm @ Plaza Branch

In a discussion of his new book, On the Rocketship: How Top Charter Schools are Pushing the Envelope, veteran reporter and former USA TODAY editorial writer Richard Whitmire spotlights the nonprofit Rocketship Education network of public elementary charter schools.

Whitmire, who tracked Rocketship through an entire school year fraught with change and controversy, examines the group’s beginnings, its growing pains, and why some see it as an innovative model for improving public education for lower-income urban students.

The event – co-presented by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation – is part of the KC Education Speaker Series, which brings leading thinkers in education to Kansas City audiences.


Sunday, October 12, 2014
2:00pm @ Plaza Branch

Before the birth of Kansas City jazz, the musical community served up ragtime and blues. In 1917, the military-themed anthem “Over There” became a nationwide hit following America’s entry into the war. Peabody Award-winning radio personality Michael Lasser explores the popular songs inspired by World War I, many of which we still hum today.

Lasser has been called “a walking encyclopedia of American song” and is the author of America’s Songs II: Songs from the 1890s to the Post-War Years. He hosts a weekly syndicated radio show “Fascinatin’ Rhythm.”


Friday, October 10, 2014
6:30pm @ Plaza Branch

Join in a Mustache Baby party!

Bridget Heos’ book about a curiously mustachioed newborn is one of 10 nominated for the Missouri Library Association’s Building Block Picture Book Award. Kids can meet the Kansas City author, learn more about her book, play games, and make crafts. Don’t forget to bring a camera for a Mustache Baby photo op.

Recommended for kids preschool and older.


Thursday, October 9, 2014

Register here

PLEASE NOTE: This is not a free event. Admission for dinner and the program is $15 for students, $25 for adults, and $45 for couples. Registration is required.

Dinner: 6 p.m. • Program: 6:30 p.m.

In an age of crippling political divisiveness, Allan Katz has a plan. Gather people with opposing viewpoints in a comfortable setting. Share a meal. And rationally, respectfully talk out the most pressing issues of the day.

Katz, a University of Missouri-Kansas City professor and former U.S. ambassador to Portugal, has helped make it work in Florida and California. Now, he introduces the initiative he co-founded — The Village Square — to Kansas City, moderating a discussion among national and local decision-makers that touches on issues ranging from tax incentives to immigration and addresses the cost of impasse arising from incivility.


Wednesday, October 8, 2014

What happens when German spies collaborate to unleash a campaign of terror upon America at the start of World War I?

In Dark Invasion: 1915, a New York City policeman uncovers a German plot to sabotage ships, factories, and even J.P Morgan himself. Howard Blum tells a gripping, true story of espionage and terror on American soil during World War I and the Irish cop who hunted for the conspirators among a population of more than 8 million Germans.

Blum is the author of The New York Times bestseller and Edgar Award-winning American Lightning. He is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.


Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Facebook. Twitter. Amazon. Frequent-flyer numbers. Loyalty cards. Every day, we share personal information while buying something, trying to gain access or perks, or engaging in some other ordinary activity.

In a discussion of his revealing new book, Adam Tanner illustrates how each bit of personal data we surrender can be combined with alarming speed into a personal profile that corporations, marketing services, and more nefarious entities use to their own advantage. Nobody does it better, he says, than Caesars Entertainment Corporation, whose Harrah’s North Kansas City casino — and its savvy senior vice president and general manager, Tom Cook — figure prominently in What Stays in Vegas.


Sunday, October 5, 2014
2:00pm @ Plaza Branch

Coterie Theatre artists read from Karma Wilson’s popular children’s book, about a barnyard cow with peculiar mealtime tastes, while young audience members enjoy an opportunity to “jump into the story” – adding their own improvisation.

Appropriate for all ages.