Previous Special Events

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Tommy Terrific’s Wacky Magic Show honoring the Tuskegee Airmen plays at five Library locations. For ages 4 and up.


Tuesday, February 14, 2012
10:00am @ Westport Branch

Tommy Terrific’s Wacky Magic Show honoring the Tuskegee Airmen plays at five Library locations. For ages 4 and up.


Sunday, February 12, 2012
2:00pm @ Plaza Branch

The Kansas City Public Library invites children and parents to be part of monthly interactive story times presented by the Coterie Theatre. Theatre artists read from their favorite children's books while audience members enjoy an opportunity to "jump into the story" on stage.


Saturday, February 11, 2012

Musician/historian James Christopher Edwards brings the Civil War in Kansas and Missouri to life in this musical program about the notorious bushwacker “Bloody” Bill Anderson.

Edwards’ program is drawn from his new CD Blood on the Border, a musical narrative about Quantrill’s Raiders. Edwards has taught classical and folk guitar, and holds a master’s degree in history (with an emphasis on the Civil War in Missouri) from the University of Missouri.


Friday, February 10, 2012
6:30pm @ Plaza Branch

The Reading Reptile, Kansas City Public Library, and Johnson County Library close the 19th Annual Young Writers Contest with the announcement of winners at a grand reception.

Local writers and illustrators of children’s books will greet the winners. Past judges include: Lisa Campbell Ernst, Brad Sneed, Jenny Whitehead, Pete Whitehead, Bob Kolar, Dana Regan, Shane Evans, and Laura Huliska-Beith.


Thursday, February 9, 2012

Jennifer Phegley, chair of the Department of English at the University of Missouri – Kansas City, examines how many of our modern marriage traditions – including wedding dresses and honeymoons – have their roots in the Victorian era.


Wednesday, February 8, 2012
6:30pm @ Plaza Branch

Adam Arenson, assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at El Paso, examines the efforts of St. Louis’ intellectuals and mercantile elite to make their city the capital of a vast Western empire in the wake of the Civil War.

That ambitious dream was never realized, but the city grew to be a vital cultural and commercial hub. The largest city along the border between free and slave states, St. Louis became a microcosm of the dueling moral systems and competing national visions that dominated mid-19th century America.


Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Lee Ward, owner of the Museum of Funeral History in Independence, discusses 150 years of African-American funeral homes, which in the decades of segregation provided the black community with end-of-life services denied by white businesses. Among the names of these enterprises were those of T.B. Watkins, Adkins, Kerford, and H.B. Moore.


Tuesday, February 7, 2012
1:00pm @ Waldo Branch

The Kansas City Public Library celebrates Black History Month by hosting Brother John Anderson for performances of The Buffalo Soldiers: Black Knights of the West at two Library branches.


Tuesday, February 7, 2012
10:00am @ Westport Branch

The Kansas City Public Library celebrates Black History Month by hosting Brother John Anderson for performances of The Buffalo Soldiers: Black Knights of the West at two Library branches.


Kansas City Public Library Beta