Exhibit Looks at the Progressive Era, A Reaction To the Industrialization of the Late 19th Century

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

For Immediate Release:
October 26, 2012
Contact: Robert Butler
816.701.3729
Exhibit Looks at the Progressive Era, A Reaction To the Industrialization of the Late 19th Century

With America's late 19th-century transformation into a modern industrial society came many social and economic problems. These in turn inspired a broad-ranging reform movement working to make government more democratic, to lessen the effects of industrialization, and to regulate business.

Now, 100 years after Theodore Roosevelt ran for President on the Progressive Party ticket, this movement is examined in the exhibit The Age of Progressive Reform: Creating Modern America, 1900-1917, on display Thursday, November 1, 2012 to November 29, 2012 at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

The years between 1864 and 1900 found thousands of unskilled workers laboring for new corporations. Deep divides separated wealthy capitalists from poor workers. Urban growth paralleled industrial development, with American cities becoming home to workers and migrants from all over the world.

For many, the new industrial order ruptured past ways of life. The Progressive Era was a response to these conditions.
Featured in this exhibit are letters, cartoons, pictures, and broadsides illustrating America's transformation into a modern, industrial society.

The exhibition was developed by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and curated by Kirsten Swinth, Magis Distinguished Professor of History and Director of the American Studies Program at Fordham University.

Admission is free. Free parking is available in the Library District parking garage at 10th & Baltimore.