Veteran Re-enactor Charles Everett Pace Brings His One-Man Show on Frederick Douglass to the Library

For Immediate Release:
February 6, 2014
Contact: Courtney Lewis
816.701.3669
Veteran Re-enactor Charles Everett Pace Brings His One-Man Show on Frederick Douglass to the Library

Born a slave in 1818, Frederick Douglass successfully escaped to the North in 1838 and quickly rose to the front ranks of leading abolitionists, becoming the most famous black American of his day.

His story comes to life when veteran re-enactor Charles Everett Pace presents his one-man show An Evening With Frederick Douglass on Wednesday, February 19, 2014, at 6:30 p.m. in the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

In the years leading up to the Civil War, Douglass' incisive anti-slavery writings and mesmerizing speeches reached broad audiences in the United States and the British Isles.

Following emancipation, Douglass continued to lecture and write on civil rights issues, including women's rights and desegregation. He wrote several versions of his autobiography between 1845 and 1892.
                                                                                                                          
Charles Everett Pace is a leading solo historical performer exploring how African American leaders have helped to advance democracy and overcome the obstacles of racial prejudice in American society. Among the historic figures he portrays are W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, and Malcolm X.

Admission is free. RSVP at kclibrary.org or call 816.701.3407. A 6 p.m. reception precedes the program. Free parking is available in the Library District parking garage at 10th & Baltimore.