Radio Interviews

KCUR, Kansas City's local NPR station, hosts on its programs many of the authors and speakers that visit the Library. This page lists these interviews and provides links for you to listen to the programs.

  • The Kansas City Star’s Steve Paul discusses his new book, a collection of “KC Architecture A-Z” columns that have appeared in Star Magazine. The book contains more than 200 photographs of Kansas City’s architectural scene.
    Steve Paul: KC Architecture A to Z
    Tuesday, October 25, 2011
    Central Library

    Architecture A-Z began as a Star Magazine feature based on a simple concept: What can we learn and share about Kansas City’s history and contemporary scene if we take a simple walk through the alphabet?

  • Central Standard, the award-winning KCUR morning program, hosts a variety show to commemorate the one-year anniversary of its inception.
    The Central Standard Variety Show
    Friday, October 7, 2011
    Central Library

    Central Standard, the award-winning KCUR morning program, hosts a variety show to commemorate the one year anniversary of its inception.

    Since replacing the legendary Walt Bodine Show Monday-Thursday at 10 a.m. beginning in October 2010, Central Standard host Jabulani Leffall and producer Andrea Silenzi have rapidly developed a strong, eclectic following in the area by exploring the different worlds within Kansas City.

  • Award-winning historian  William C. Harris argues that Confederate campaigns and guerrilla activities kept the region in constant turmoil, and that those states preoccupied Lincoln throughout the war.
    William C. Harris: Lincoln and the Border States
    Thursday, October 6, 2011
    Central Library

    Faced with a divided nation, Abraham Lincoln deemed the loyalty of the border slave states crucial to the preservation of the Union. But while most scholars contend that these states were secure by the end of 1861, award-winning historian William C. Harris argues in Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union, that Confederate campaigns and guerrilla activities kept the region in constant turmoil, and that those states preoccupied Lincoln throughout the war.

  • The Kansas City Public Library and The Reading Reptile present Caldecott Winner Brian Selznick who will present his latest book Wonderstruck. A percentage of the evening’s book sales will be donated to the Turning the Page effort for Joplin public schools.
    Brian Selznick: Wonderstruck
    Wednesday, October 5, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Brian Selznick, creator of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, a Caldecott Medal winner, presents his newest novel, Wonderstruck. This event is part of Turning the Page: Building a Community of Readers campaign to benefit Joplin Missouri schools. A percentage of the evening’s book sales will be donated to the campaign.

    RSVP online at www.kclibrary.org or pick up a free ticket from Reading Reptile.

    Co-sponsored by Reading Reptile.

    No audio or video recording of Brian Selznick’s presentation will be permitted.

  • The Social Media Club of Kansas City joins community thought leaders in a public discussion of how Google Fiber high-speed internet can impact the city’s infrastructure, economy, educational systems, and beyond.
    Building the Gigabit City: Brainstorming a Google Fiber Roadmap
    Monday, October 3, 2011
    Central Library

    In the six months since choosing Kansas City as a test market for its new fiber-optic network, Google has asked for community input in planning how this technology will be used.

  • From hilarious scenes from his youth to the present state his parents helped create, Frank Schaeffer asks what the leading right-wingers and the paranoid fantasies of their “echo chamber” are really about. Here’s a hint…sex.
    Frank Schaeffer: Sex, Mom, and God
    Tuesday, September 27, 2011
    Central Library

    In his New York Times best-selling book, Frank Schaeffer uses his life as a lens through which to view a larger narrative: the rightward lurch of American politics since the 1970s.

    The central character is Schaeffer’s far-from-prudish evangelical mother, who sweetly but bizarrely provides startling juxtapositions of the religious and the sensual throughout Schaeffer’s childhood.

    Schaeffer asks what the leading right-wingers and the paranoid fantasies of their “echo chamber” are really about. Here’s a hint... sex.

  • Author Carolyn Brewer discusses the 1957 tornado that killed 39 people and left 531 injured and shares first-person narratives collected during a 50-year reunion and memorial rededication.
    Carolyn Brewer - Caught Ever After: Children of the Ruskin Heights Tornado
    Sunday, September 25, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    On the evening of May 20, 1957, an F-5 tornado tore into the communities of Ottawa and Spring Hill, Kansas, and Martin City, Grandview, Hickman Mills, and Ruskin Heights, Missouri. The storm left 39 people dead and 531 injured. More than 840 homes and businesses were damaged or destroyed.

    Author Carolyn Brewer tells the story of the tragic event, as well as the rebuilding effort, through a series of first-person narratives collected during a 50-year reunion and memorial rededication.

  • Columnist and political commentator John Avlon discusses the history of the American newspaper column and shares his views on where the newspaper industry is headed in what has proven to be a tumultuous period for all media.
    John Avlon - Deadline Artists: America’s Greatest Newspaper Columns
    Thursday, September 22, 2011
    Central Library

    Columnist and political commentator John Avlon discusses his new book Deadline Artists: America’s Greatest Newspaper Columns.

    Deadline Artists is a celebration of the American newspaper column. It includes columns by several masters of the craft, including: H.L. Mencken, Ernie Pyle, Murray Kempton, Jimmy Breslin, and Mike Royko. It also includes columns written by public figures, including one by Theodore Roosevelt that appeared in The Kansas City Star.

  • Jack Becker, executive director of Minnesota-based Forecast Public Art and publisher of Public Art Review, discusses the complex, beneficial, and sometimes contentious role that art plays in the public realm.
    Jack Becker: Public Art/Civic Catalyst
    Wednesday, September 21, 2011
    Central Library

    Public art and its accompanying community participation contribute significantly to the identity of a city. In addition to inspiring dialogue and providing visual appeal, a varied civic public art collection often symbolizes the vitality of the city it inhabits.

    Jack Becker, executive director of Minnesota-based Forecast Public Art and publisher of Public Art Review, discusses the complex, beneficial, and sometimes contentious role that art plays in the public realm.

  • Daniel Serda reports his findings on immigration, discrimination, and preservation of Hispanic culture followed by Gene Chavez discussing the social and political dynamics that shape how communities co-exist and thrive.
    Daniel Serda and Gene Chavez: Nuestra Herencia Americana (Our American Heritage)
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011
    Central Library

    The 2011 Corinthian Hall lecture addresses minority heritage and a museum’s mission, capacity, and duty in this arena.

    Nuestra Herencia Americana (Our American Heritage) features Daniel Serda and his findings on immigration, discrimination, and preservation of Hispanic culture. Following Serda’s presentation, Gene Chavez discusses the social and political dynamics that shape how majority and minority communities co-exist and thrive.

    Co-sponsored by the Kansas City Museum at Corinthian Hall.