Radio Interviews

KCUR, Kansas City's local NPR station, hosts on its programs many of the authors and speakers that visit the Library. This page lists these interviews and provides links for you to listen to the programs.

  • Kansas City natives Michael Herzmark and Melissa Wayne present a documentary on Selma as a microcosm of the issues facing America today. A town hall meeting moderated by Carl Boyd follows, highlighting challenges Kansas City faces.
    45 Years Across the Bridge: The Battles of Selma, Alabama
    Thursday, August 25, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Filmmakers and Kansas City natives Michael Herzmark and Melissa Wayne present 45 Years Across the Bridge: The Battle of Selma, Alabama, a one hour documentary that frames the story of modern-day Selma as a microcosm of the issues facing much of America today.

  • Historian Terry Beckenbaugh marks the 150th anniversary of The Battle of Wilson’s Creek – fought just minutes from Springfield, Missouri – and explains how Confederate forces won the battle but lost the state.
    Terry Beckenbaugh: The Battle of Wilson’s Creek
    Thursday, August 11, 2011
    Central Library

    Terry Beckenbaugh of the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the first Civil War battle fought west of the Mississippi River, which took place in southwestern Missouri.

    On August 10, 1861, Union General Nathaniel Lyon — who was encamped at Springfield with nearly 6,000 men — led a surprise attack on 12,000 secessionist troops camped at Wilson’s Creek. While the Confederates won the battle, they were left in no condition to pursue the retreating Federal forces, and Missouri remained under Union control.

  • Library Director Crosby Kemper III leads a public conversation with Boulevard Brewing Company founder John McDonald exploring how his award-winning company became the largest craft brewer in the Midwest and the largest independent American brewer  in Missouri.
    A Conversation with John McDonald
    Wednesday, August 3, 2011
    Central Library

    Join a public conversation with local brewing pioneer John McDonald, founder of Boulevard Brewing Company.

    McDonald, recently named the 2011 Brewers Association Recognition Award winner, started the brewery in 1989 and hand delivered Boulevard beer to local restaurants in his pick-up truck. Today, his company employs over 90 people.

    Since 1989, the award-winning company has grown to become the largest craft brewer in the Midwest and the largest independent American brewer in Missouri.

  • On the 30th anniversary of Kansas City’s Hyatt Regency hotel walkway collapse, Steve Kraske of The Kansas City Star leads a panel discussion of a new book about the causes of the structural failure, the rescue efforts, and the many lessons learned.
    A Dance, Then Disaster: The Hyatt Tragedy and Lessons Learned
    Sunday, July 17, 2011
    Central Library

    July 17, 2011, marks the 30th anniversary of Kansas City’s Hyatt Regency hotel walkway collapse that killed 114 people and injured 216.

    Kansas City Star Books has partnered with the Skywalk Memorial Foundation to produce a new book — A Dance, Then Disaster: The Hyatt Tragedy and Lessons Learned.

    The book explores the structural failure, the rescue efforts, and the many lessons learned—from improved first-responder techniques to revised architectural and engineering standards.

    This presentation is part of the Missouri Valley Speakers Series.

  • Emory University historian Deborah E. Lipstadt examines the May 1960 capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina and his  subsequent trial that electrified  the world.
    Deborah E. Lipstadt: The Eichmann Trial
    Wednesday, June 29, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Emory University historian Deborah E. Lipstadt examines the May 1960 capture of SS Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann by Israeli agents in Argentina and his subsequent trial that electrified the world.

  • Celebrate the 40th birthday of Ziggy with an appearance by Tom Wilson, who has been responsible for the franchise since taking over from his father in 1987, and be among the first to see the new book celebrating four decades of Ziggy comics.
    Tom Wilson: Ziggy
    Tuesday, June 28, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    The Kansas City Public Library celebrates the 40th birthday of Ziggy with an appearance by Tom Wilson, who has been drawing the iconic cartoon since 1987. Wilson will discuss the release of a new book commemorating the 40th anniversary of the comic strip.

    Tom Wilson Sr. created Ziggy in 1971.

  • Renowned gardening expert Ethne Clarke discusses her book Hidcote, which tells the story of Hidcote Manor Garden, one of the most influential English gardens of the 20th century.
    Ethne Clarke - Hidcote: The Making of a Garden
    Sunday, June 26, 2011
    Central Library

    Gardening expert Ethne Clarke discusses her book Hidcote: The Making of a Garden.

    Hidcote is the first biography of Major Lawrence Johnston, a British soldier who established the Hidcote Manor Garden that is now in the care of the National Trust in the UK. Clarke is the editor in chief of Organic Gardening magazine and winner of the 1987 Angel Literary Award for Art of the Kitchen Garden.

  • DePaul University political scientist Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held  ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.
    Larry Bennett - The Third City: Chicago and American Urbanism
    Thursday, June 23, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Author Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.

    Bennett, a professor of political science at DePaul University, calls contemporary Chicago “the third city” to distinguish it from its two predecessors: “the first city,” a sprawling industrial center whose historical arc ran from the Civil War to the Great Depression; and “the second city,” the Rustbelt exemplar of the period from around 1950 to 1990.

  • The authors of The Sumner Story discuss the inspiring stories of graduates from the formerly segregated black high school in Kansas City, Kansas.
    The Sumner Story
    Thursday, June 16, 2011
    Central Library

    The authors of The Sumner Story discuss the history of Sumner High School, the formerly segregated black high school in Kansas City, Kansas, that is now the college-prep oriented Sumner Academy, which is consistently ranked among the top high schools in America.

    The book offers awe-inspiring details about the success of the school. The authors include Sumner alumni Wilma F. Bonner, Johnnieque Blackmon Love, Sandra Freelain, and Dwight D. Henderson.

  • Professor David Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.
    David Meyers: Medicine in the Civil War
    Sunday, June 5, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    David Meyers, a professor of medicine- cardiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center, presents a discussion on Medicine in the Civil War.

    Meyers is a member of the Society of Civil War Surgeons. For more than 25 years, he has lectured on Civil War medicine. In his presentation, Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.