Radio Interviews

All Library locations are closed today, Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

KCUR, Kansas City's local NPR station, hosts on its programs many of the authors and speakers that visit the Library. This page lists these interviews and provides links for you to listen to the programs.

  • Award-winning author Mariko Nagai discusses her new collection of short stories based on Japanese folk tales and history.
    Mariko Nagai - Georgic: Stories
    Monday, May 16, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Award-winning author Mariko Nagai shares the sources of inspiration for her new book, Georgic: Stories, including Japanese folk tales and history.

  • On the 50th anniversary of Alan Shepard's pioneering space mission, Roger D. Launius of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum reconsiders the legacy of Project Mercury and America's first astronauts.
    Roger D. Launius - The Right Stuff Revisited: Project Mercury 50 Years On
    Thursday, May 5, 2011
    Central Library

    On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American in space, making a brief suborbital mission that marked the first manned launch of Project Mercury.

    Roger D. Launius, a senior curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, reconsiders NASA’s pioneering program, examining the origins of these first attempts to reach into space, the Cold War “space race,” and Project Mercury’s meaning a half-century later.

  • Gregorio Luke offers a blow-by-blow description of the Battle of Puebla in 1862 in a multimedia presentation featuring paintings, illustrations, and maps.
    Gregorio Luke: Cinco de Mayo
    Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Central Library

    Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican victory over the French invaders at the Battle of Puebla in1862. Now one of the most popular celebrations in the Latino community, it is an inspiration for the oppressed everywhere and an example that no army however powerful can overcome a united and determined people.

    On Wednesday, May 4, 2011, distinguished Mexican lecturer Gregorio Luke offers a blow by blow description of the battle plus historical background on the attempt by France to turn Mexico into a colony during the 1860s in a multimedia presentation featuring period paintings, illustrations, and maps. The program takes place at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., and begins at 6 p.m.

  • On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters and vanished. Author Matthew Algeo discusses his new book, the first full account of the president’s disappearance and the medical condition that necessitated it.
    Matthew Algeo: The President Is a Sick Man
    Tuesday, May 3, 2011
    Central Library

    On July 1, 1893, President Grover Cleveland boarded a friend’s yacht, sailed into the waters of Long Island Sound, and disappeared. What happened was so incredible that, even when the truth was finally revealed, many Americans would not believe it.

  • Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.
    David Goldfield - America Aflame: How the Civil War Created a Nation
    Tuesday, April 26, 2011
    Central Library

    Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.

  • Longtime FBI agent William Ouseley discusses his new book about the family that ruled organized crime in Kansas City for three decades, during which time bodies turned up in car trunks, gunfire was exchanged in restaurants, and buildings were blown up.
    Bill Ouseley - Mobsters In Our Midst: The Civella Crime Family of Kansas City
    Sunday, April 17, 2011
    Central Library

    Organized crime formed part of the political, economic, and social fabric of Kansas City for much of the 20th century; and the mob’s power was never greater than in the three decades it was ruled by Nick Civella.

  • Acclaimed Purdue University historian and biographer Randy Roberts discusses the life and career of boxing icon Joe Louis.
    Randy Roberts - Joe Louis: Hard Times Man
    Tuesday, March 29, 2011
    Central Library

    Acclaimed Purdue University historian and biographer Randy Roberts discusses the life and career of boxing icon Joe Louis and explains how his impact on sport and country was unlike that of any other athlete of his era.

  • The Paris Wife, an evocative and moving novel by Paula McLain, captures a period of time and a love affair between two unforgettable figures— Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley in Paris in the 1920s.
    Paula McLain: The Paris Wife
    Wednesday, March 9, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    This evocative and moving novel by Paula McLain captures a period of time and a love affair between two unforgettable figures— Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley.

  • Be a part of a KCTV 5 live broadcast of a mayoral runoff debate before the March 22, 2011, election for the top post in Kansas City, Missouri.
    Kansas City Mayoral Runoff Debate
    Tuesday, March 8, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    With the election just around the corner, KCTV 5 partners with the Kansas City Public Library to host a runoff debate between mayoral candidates Sly James and Mike Burke for the top post in Kansas City, Missouri.

  • Historian Sir Max Hastings chronicles the final year of  World War II in the Pacific and explains how the Japanese wartime mind-set caused an otherwise civilized society to carry out atrocities that haunt the nation to this day.
    Sir Max Hastings - Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45
    Monday, March 7, 2011
    Central Library

    Author and historian Sir Max Hastings presents a talk based on his book Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944-45.