Radio Interviews

KCUR, Kansas City's local NPR station, hosts on its programs many of the authors and speakers that visit the Library. This page lists these interviews and provides links for you to listen to the programs.

  • Renowned gardening expert Ethne Clarke discusses her book Hidcote, which tells the story of Hidcote Manor Garden, one of the most influential English gardens of the 20th century.
    Ethne Clarke - Hidcote: The Making of a Garden
    Sunday, June 26, 2011
    Central Library

    Gardening expert Ethne Clarke discusses her book Hidcote: The Making of a Garden.

    Hidcote is the first biography of Major Lawrence Johnston, a British soldier who established the Hidcote Manor Garden that is now in the care of the National Trust in the UK. Clarke is the editor in chief of Organic Gardening magazine and winner of the 1987 Angel Literary Award for Art of the Kitchen Garden.

  • DePaul University political scientist Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held  ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.
    Larry Bennett - The Third City: Chicago and American Urbanism
    Thursday, June 23, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Author Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.

    Bennett, a professor of political science at DePaul University, calls contemporary Chicago “the third city” to distinguish it from its two predecessors: “the first city,” a sprawling industrial center whose historical arc ran from the Civil War to the Great Depression; and “the second city,” the Rustbelt exemplar of the period from around 1950 to 1990.

  • The authors of The Sumner Story discuss the inspiring stories of graduates from the formerly segregated black high school in Kansas City, Kansas.
    The Sumner Story
    Thursday, June 16, 2011
    Central Library

    The authors of The Sumner Story discuss the history of Sumner High School, the formerly segregated black high school in Kansas City, Kansas, that is now the college-prep oriented Sumner Academy, which is consistently ranked among the top high schools in America.

    The book offers awe-inspiring details about the success of the school. The authors include Sumner alumni Wilma F. Bonner, Johnnieque Blackmon Love, Sandra Freelain, and Dwight D. Henderson.

  • Professor David Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.
    David Meyers: Medicine in the Civil War
    Sunday, June 5, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    David Meyers, a professor of medicine- cardiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center, presents a discussion on Medicine in the Civil War.

    Meyers is a member of the Society of Civil War Surgeons. For more than 25 years, he has lectured on Civil War medicine. In his presentation, Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.

  • National Public Radio commentator Andrei Codrescu discusses his new book Whatever Gets You Through the Night, a retelling of the classic Arabian Nights.
    Andrei Codrescu: Whatever Gets You Through the Night
    Thursday, June 2, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Author and National Public Radio commentator Andrei Codrescu discusses his new book Whatever Gets You Through the Night, an irreverent and deeply funny retelling of the Arabian Nights.

  • Noted humorist Roy Blount Jr. discusses Alphabetter Juice, the follow up to the critically acclaimed Alphabet Juice.
    Roy Blount Jr.: Alphabetter Juice (or the Joy of Text)
    Thursday, May 26, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Noted humorist Roy Blount Jr. discusses Alphabetter Juice, the follow up to the critically acclaimed Alphabet Juice.

  • Historians Gary Kremer and Mark Hersey discuss the life of renowned scientist and teacher George Washington Carver—perhaps one of the most misunderstood figures in American history.
    Gary Kremer and Mark Hersey: George Washington Carver
    Tuesday, May 24, 2011

    George Washington Carver was a renowned scientist and teacher, yet he is one of the most misunderstood figures in American history. His expansive life and accomplishments are featured in a special presentation by two scholars with new and distinctive biographies on the iconic inventor.

  • Award-winning author Mariko Nagai discusses her new collection of short stories based on Japanese folk tales and history.
    Mariko Nagai - Georgic: Stories
    Monday, May 16, 2011
    Plaza Branch

    Award-winning author Mariko Nagai shares the sources of inspiration for her new book, Georgic: Stories, including Japanese folk tales and history.

  • On the 50th anniversary of Alan Shepard's pioneering space mission, Roger D. Launius of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum reconsiders the legacy of Project Mercury and America's first astronauts.
    Roger D. Launius - The Right Stuff Revisited: Project Mercury 50 Years On
    Thursday, May 5, 2011
    Central Library

    On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard became the first American in space, making a brief suborbital mission that marked the first manned launch of Project Mercury.

    Roger D. Launius, a senior curator at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, reconsiders NASA’s pioneering program, examining the origins of these first attempts to reach into space, the Cold War “space race,” and Project Mercury’s meaning a half-century later.

  • Gregorio Luke offers a blow-by-blow description of the Battle of Puebla in 1862 in a multimedia presentation featuring paintings, illustrations, and maps.
    Gregorio Luke: Cinco de Mayo
    Wednesday, May 4, 2011
    Central Library

    Cinco de Mayo commemorates the Mexican victory over the French invaders at the Battle of Puebla in1862. Now one of the most popular celebrations in the Latino community, it is an inspiration for the oppressed everywhere and an example that no army however powerful can overcome a united and determined people.

    On Wednesday, May 4, 2011, distinguished Mexican lecturer Gregorio Luke offers a blow by blow description of the battle plus historical background on the attempt by France to turn Mexico into a colony during the 1860s in a multimedia presentation featuring period paintings, illustrations, and maps. The program takes place at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., and begins at 6 p.m.