Radio Interviews

All Library locations will be closed on Saturday, July 4 in observance of Independence Day.

KCUR, Kansas City's local NPR station, hosts on its programs many of the authors and speakers that visit the Library. This page lists these interviews and provides links for you to listen to the programs.

  • In a discussion of his new book, Adam Tanner demonstrates how the personal information we routinely share with companies ranging from Amazon to casino giant Caesars Entertainment can quickly be mined and used by corporations, marketers, and more nefarious entities.
    What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data and the End of Privacy as We Know It
    Tuesday, October 7, 2014
    Central Library

    Facebook. Twitter. Amazon. Frequent-flyer numbers. Loyalty cards. Every day, we share personal information while buying something, trying to gain access or perks, or engaging in some other ordinary activity.

    In a discussion of his revealing new book, Adam Tanner illustrates how each bit of personal data we surrender can be combined with alarming speed into a personal profile that corporations, marketing services, and more nefarious entities use to their own advantage. Nobody does it better, he says, than Caesars Entertainment Corporation, whose Harrah’s North Kansas City casino — and its savvy senior vice president and general manager, Tom Cook — figure prominently in What Stays in Vegas.

  • Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history.  Appropriate for kindergartners and up.
    Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog - Ann Bausum
    Friday, October 3, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history. Appropriate for kindergartners and up.

  • In the latest installment of Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III, the Library director holds a public conversation with the influential developer of Kansas City’s Country Club Plaza,  J.C. Nichols, as portrayed by historian Bill Worley.
    Meet the Past: J.C. Nichols
    Thursday, September 11, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    From Kansas City’s signature Country Club Plaza to pristine shopping districts and neighborhoods across the country, J.C. Nichols’ imprint on the American landscape remains deep and far-reaching.

    The famed real estate developer, who died a little more than 64 years ago, is spotlighted in the latest installment of the Library’s popular Meet the Past series. Nichols — as portrayed by historian and Meet the Past veteran Bill Worley — will be interviewed by Library Director Crosby Kemper III.

    The program also includes introductory remarks about Nichols and the architectural legacy of the Country Club Plaza by Stephanie Meeks, president and chief executive officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Jonathan Kemper, president of the Library’s Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Trust Council.

    The presentation will be taped by KCPT for later broadcast.

  • Former Wall Street Journal writer Ann Hagedorn discusses her cautionary new book about the handover of a sizable element of our national security – from combat support to police training to cyber security – to private military and security companies.
    The Invisible Soldiers: How America Outsourced Our Security
    Wednesday, September 10, 2014
    Central Library

    Thirty years ago, there were no private military and security companies. Now PMSCs, as they’re known, are a vital part of American foreign and military policy, assisting in combat operations, replacing U.S. forces after their withdrawal from combat zones, and providing maritime security, police training, drone operations, cyber security, and intelligence analysis.

    In a discussion of her new book, journalist Ann Hagedorn takes a worried look at this privatization of our national security – why it originated, how it operates, where it’s heading, and the dangers it poses.

    Hagedorn is a former staff writer for The Wall Street Journal. Among her books are Wild Ride, Ransom, Beyond the River, and Savage Peace.

  • Popular Kansas City blogger  Jen Mann launches her witty, often biting new book on suburban life, marriage, and motherhood – People I Want to Punch in the Throat: Competitive Crafters, Drop-Off Despots, and Other Suburban Scourges – with a discussion and signing.
    People I Want to Punch in the Throat - Jen Mann
    Tuesday, September 9, 2014
    Central Library

    Jen Mann is, first, a suburban Johnson County, Kansas, wife and mother of two and, second, a witty, biting writer whose blog, People I Want to Punch in the Throat, has garnered a national following. Featured on The Huffington Post, the young parents’ online magazine Babble, and cable television’s Headline News, she has been described as Erma Bombeck – with f-bombs.

    Mann appears at the Library to launch her new book, People I Want to Punch in the Throat: Competitive Crafters, Drop-Off Despots, and Other Suburban Scourges, a laugh-out-loud collection of essays on suburban life, marriage, and motherhood. Subjects range from the politics of joining a play group to the thrill of a moms’ night out at the gun range.

  • Stuart Davies, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s Global Earth Observatories project, addresses the importance of healthy forests – our planet’s lungs – in the latest installment of a series of talks by Smithsonian scientists.
    Why Healthy Forests Matter
    Thursday, August 28, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    Forests produce lumber, shelter a dazzling variety of plant and animal life, and serve as our planet’s lungs, cleansing the atmosphere of carbon dioxide. But we’re losing them at an alarming rate.

    The Smithsonian Institution’s Stuart Davies addresses their importance to the overall health of our planet in the third installment of Conserving Our Dynamic Planet, a series featuring talks by Smithsonian scientists and co-presented by the Linda Hall Library.

    Davies, a tropical ecologist with 22 years of experience working throughout the tropics, is director of the Smithsonian’s Center for Tropical Forest Science.

  • Twenty-three years after memorably accusing Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment, Anita Hill visits the Library for the screening of a documentary chronicling that historic event. Following the film, she will take audience questions.
    Anita: Speaking Truth to Power - Anita Hill
    Tuesday, August 26, 2014

    Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

    Twenty-three years after she riveted a nation – sitting before a microphone in a bright blue suit, calmly telling an all-male Senate committee that she once was subjected to sexual harassment by Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas – Anita Hill will appear at a Kansas City Public Library event commemorating that historic event.

  • Former State Department and CIA intelligence analyst Mark Stout discusses the birth of modern American espionage during World War I, from aerial reconnaissance and battlefield code-breaking to the search for spies and saboteurs back home in the States.
    Intelligence and Espionage During World War I - Mark Stout
    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Central Library

    Former State Department and CIA intelligence analyst Mark Stout discusses the birth of modern American espionage during World War I, from aerial reconnaissance and battlefield code-breaking to the search for spies and saboteurs back home in the States.

  • Historian Petra DeWitt examines the suspicions and hostilities faced by Missouri’s sizable German American population during World War I, including questions about loyalty and an effort to ban the German language in the state.
    Missouri’s German Americans During World War I - Petra DeWitt
    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    Central Library

    Historian Petra DeWitt examines the suspicions and hostilities faced by Missouri’s sizable German American population during World War I, including questions about loyalty and an effort to ban the German language in the state.

  • John E. Miller discusses his book about how giants of American art, industry, and politics – the likes of Walt Disney, Henry Ford, George Washington Carver, and Ronald Reagan – were nurtured and shaped by their boyhoods in small Midwestern towns.
    Small-Town Dreams: Stories of Midwestern Boys Who Shaped America
    Tuesday, August 12, 2014
    Central Library

    The Midwest’s small towns have produced the entrepreneurial likes of Henry Ford, George Washington Carver, and Walt Disney; artists and entertainers such as Thomas Hart Benton, Grant Wood, Carl Sandburg, and Johnny Carson; and political titans William McKinley, William Jennings Bryan, and Ronald Reagan.

    In a discussion of his new book, Small Town Dreams: Stories of Midwestern Boys Who Shaped America, author John E. Miller explores the lives of those and other notables and the small-town environments from which they came. In their stories, as Miller tells them, all appear in a new light – unique in their backgrounds and accomplishments, united only in the way their lives reveal the persisting, shaping power of place.