High Noon: The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of an American Classic

Glenn Frankel
In a discussion of his new book, former Washington Post reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel examines the origins and making of the 1952 film classic High Noon – crafted by writer Carl Foreman as a parable about ’50s industry blacklisting.
Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Program: 
6:30 pm
High Noon remains one of the most revered movies of Hollywood's golden era, an Old West testament to loyalty and determination in the face of evil. Starring Gary Cooper, it won four Academy Awards in 1953.
 
Less known is the story of its writer, Carl Foreman, who saw High Noon as a parable about industry blacklisting. A former Communist Party member, he was called while writing the screenplay to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee.
 
In a discussion of his new book, former Washington Post reporter and Pulitzer Prize winner Glenn Frankel uses clips from the film in examining its making and explains how Foreman’s concept evolved from first draft to final script. The presentation is preceded by a screening of High Noon at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, March 20, at the Plaza Branch.