Resetting the Supreme Court

Jeffrey Rosen
Hanging in the balance as the nation elected a new president was a U.S. Supreme Court vacancy created the previous February, when Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly. Donald Trump, in fact, could wind up making multiple appointments to an aging court that includes Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 83; Anthony Kennedy, 80; and Stephen Breyer, 79.
Thursday, January 12, 2017
Reception: 
6 pm
Program: 
6:30 pm
Event at Capacity
Event Videos
RSVP Required

We are expecting a capacity crowd for this event. The doors to the Truman Forum Auditorium will open at 5:45 p.m. and attendees will be admitted on a first come-first served basis. Please note: An RSVP does not guarantee a seat in the auditorium. Overflow seating will be made available in the Northwest Corner on the main floor of the Library, where the event will be shown via closed circuit television. A livestream will also be available at youtube.com/kclibrary.

Hanging in the balance as the nation elected a new president was a U.S. Supreme Court vacancy created the previous February, when Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly. Donald Trump, in fact, could wind up making multiple appointments to an aging court that includes Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 83; Anthony Kennedy, 80; and Stephen Breyer, 79.
 
Jeffrey Rosen, one of the nation’s preeminent authorities on the Supreme Court, discusses the significance of the shorthanded court, the resultant backlog of cases, and implications for the court’s ideological direction stemming from Trump’s election.
 
Rosen is president and CEO of the National Constitution Center, a law professor at George Washington University, and a contributing editor of The Atlantic.
 
Co-presented by the Truman Library Institute and the Historical Society for the Western District of Missouri (Howard Sachs Chapter).