Event Video

All Library locations will close at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, December 24 and remain closed on Thursday, December 25 in observance of the Christmas holiday.

To view a video recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter.

  • Kansas City’s Henry W. Bloch co-founded H&R Block Inc. in 1955 and helped build it into the world’s largest tax preparation company. During Global Entrepreneurship Week, he sits down with son Tom Bloch to outline what others can learn from his experiences.
    Seven Lessons for Entrepreneurs - Henry W. Bloch, Tom Bloch
    Tuesday, November 18, 2014
    Central Library

    One of Kansas City’s greatest entrepreneurs, Henry W. Bloch co-founded H&R Block Inc. in 1955 and helped build it into the world’s largest tax preparation company.

    Now 92, he sits down with his son, Tom Bloch, for a conversation covering seven timeless lessons for entrepreneurs gleaned from his experiences. The presentation is held in conjunction with Global Entrepreneurship Week and the paperback release of the younger Bloch’s 2010 book Many Happy Returns: The Story of Henry Bloch, America’s Tax Man.

    Tom Bloch worked closely with his father at H&R Block for nearly two decades. He left the company in 1995 to teach in inner-city Kansas City, and co-founded University Academy.

  • Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history.  Appropriate for kindergartners and up.
    Stubby the War Dog: The True Story of World War I’s Bravest Dog - Ann Bausum
    Friday, October 3, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    Award-winning author Ann Bausum tells a true story of a terrier that wandered onto an Army training field, befriending Pvt. James Robert Conroy and accompanying him into the trenches of World War I and onto the pages of history. Appropriate for kindergartners and up.

  • In the latest installment of Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III, the Library director holds a public conversation with the influential developer of Kansas City’s Country Club Plaza,  J.C. Nichols, as portrayed by historian Bill Worley.
    Meet the Past: J.C. Nichols
    Thursday, September 11, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    From Kansas City’s signature Country Club Plaza to pristine shopping districts and neighborhoods across the country, J.C. Nichols’ imprint on the American landscape remains deep and far-reaching.

    The famed real estate developer, who died a little more than 64 years ago, is spotlighted in the latest installment of the Library’s popular Meet the Past series. Nichols — as portrayed by historian and Meet the Past veteran Bill Worley — will be interviewed by Library Director Crosby Kemper III.

    The program also includes introductory remarks about Nichols and the architectural legacy of the Country Club Plaza by Stephanie Meeks, president and chief executive officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and Jonathan Kemper, president of the Library’s Board of Trustees and co-chair of the National Trust Council.

    The presentation will be taped by KCPT for later broadcast.

  • Former State Department and CIA intelligence analyst Mark Stout discusses the birth of modern American espionage during World War I, from aerial reconnaissance and battlefield code-breaking to the search for spies and saboteurs back home in the States.
    Intelligence and Espionage During World War I - Mark Stout
    Wednesday, August 20, 2014
    Central Library

    Former State Department and CIA intelligence analyst Mark Stout discusses the birth of modern American espionage during World War I, from aerial reconnaissance and battlefield code-breaking to the search for spies and saboteurs back home in the States.

  • Historian Petra DeWitt examines the suspicions and hostilities faced by Missouri’s sizable German American population during World War I, including questions about loyalty and an effort to ban the German language in the state.
    Missouri’s German Americans During World War I - Petra DeWitt
    Sunday, August 17, 2014
    Central Library

    Historian Petra DeWitt examines the suspicions and hostilities faced by Missouri’s sizable German American population during World War I, including questions about loyalty and an effort to ban the German language in the state.

  •  In a discussion of his book, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford, historian John Robert Greene examines Ford’s struggle to restore the prestige of the office amid a host of challenges – starting with the lingering distaste of Richard Nixon’s resignation.
    Gerald R. Ford - John Robert Greene
    Thursday, August 7, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    Thrust into the nation’s highest office following Richard Nixon’s resignation, Gerald R. Ford faced the impossible task of achieving much in little time and in the face of great adversity.

    Historian John Robert Greene examines the 38th president’s struggle to restore the prestige of the office — after Nixon’s misdeeds, during an ignominious departure from Vietnam, and amid Congress’ intentions to scale back presidential power — in a discussion of his book, The Presidency of Gerald R. Ford.

  • The Library launches a series of programs commemorating the centennial of the start of World War I with military historian D.M. Giangreco’s look at 34-year-old Army National Guard Capt. Harry S. Truman.
    Captain Harry Goes to War - D.M. Giangreco
    Wednesday, August 6, 2014
    Central Library

    The Library launches a series of programs commemorating the centennial of the start of World War I with military historian D.M. Giangreco’s look at 34-year-old Army National Guard Capt. Harry S. Truman.

  • Celebrate what would have been the 102nd birthday of Nobel Prize-winner Milton Friedman as Mark Skousen relates stories from his long friendship with his fellow economist and libertarian icon.
    Milton's Paradise: My Friendly Fights with Milton Friedman
    Thursday, July 31, 2014
    Central Library

    Celebrate what would have been the 102nd birthday of Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman as Mark Skousen relates stories from his long friendship with the economist and libertarian icon.

    Friedman was the intellectual architect of the free market reforms of the post-World War II era who today is recognized as the father of the Chicago school of economics and libertarian philosophy. His book, Capitalism and Freedom, has sold well over half a million copies in English and been translated into 18 languages.

    Skousen, a former CIA economist, has taught at Columbia Business School, Barnard College, and Columbia University and written for Forbes magazine. He is editor in chief of the Forecasts & Strategies newsletter.

  • Thomas W. Devine discusses his book about the presidential candidate who was ahead of his time on many issues – including civil rights and universal government health insurance – but was branded a Communist dupe.
    Henry Wallace's 1948 Presidential Campaign and the Future of Postwar Liberalism
    Wednesday, July 30, 2014
    Plaza Branch

    Progressive Henry Wallace ran for president in 1948 on a platform that advocated an end to the Cold War (he thought domestic fascism was more dangerous than any threat from the USSR), a stop to racial segregation, full voting rights for blacks, and universal government health insurance. On many issues, he was decades ahead of his time.

    Yet Wallace could not shake his label as a Communist dupe. As Thomas W. Devine points out in a discussion of his book — winner of the Harry S. Truman Book Award — this was an issue that would trouble progressive and liberal politicians for decades to come.

  • On the 150th anniversary of the railway-focused Battle of Atlanta, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s Christopher R. Gabel examines the importance of rail transportation to both Union and Confederate commanders.
    Railroads and the Civil War
    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
    Central Library

    Railroads were essential to moving men and military supplies during the Civil War. The Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, was an attempt by federal troops under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman to seize Atlanta’s rail center and cripple the Confederate war effort.

    On the 150th anniversary of that battle, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s Christopher R. Gabel examines the importance of rail transportation to both Union and Confederate commanders.

    The Confederacy’s rail system performed just well enough in the first two years of the war to keep the fledgling nation in the fight. Ultimately, though, the Southern railroads lost their capacity to support the war, while the Northern railroads achieved unprecedented levels of effectiveness.