Event Video

To view a video recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter.

  • On the 149th anniversary of  his raid on Lawrence, Kansas confederate guerilla leader William Clarke Quantrill (portrayed by Aaron Worley) discusses his bloody and controversial career as a Civil War bushwhacker. The session is being taped for later broadcast by KCPT-TV.
    Meet the Past - William Clarke Quantrill
    Tuesday, August 21, 2012
    Central Library

    Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III returns for a conversation with William Clarke Quantrill, portrayed by Aaron Worley, on the 149th anniversary of Quantrill’s raid on Lawrence, Kansas.

    Quantrill earned notoriety for the 1863 raid on the abolitionist stronghold of Lawrence, in which some 180 unarmed men and boys were killed.

    The event will be taped by KCPT for later broadcast.

  • Novelist Thomas Mallon uses both drama and satire to take us behind the scenes of America’s biggest, wildest, most traumatic political scandal.
    Thomas Mallon - Watergate
    Thursday, August 9, 2012
    Central Library

    Many historians have written about the Watergate conspiracy. But can a novelist throw new light on this traumatic moment in American political history?

    Thomas Mallon does just that in Watergate, using drama and comedy to take readers behind the scenes of a national scandal, creating “a universal tragicomedy of ludicrous errors and malignant crimes, epic hubris and sorrow.”

    Mallon is the author of Henry and Clara, Two Moons, Dewey Defeats Truman, and Aurora 7.

  • Be part of the studio audience as KCPT tapes the latest installment of Meet the Past when Crosby Kemper III interviews 19th-century painter George Caleb Bingham, as portrayed by Robert Gibby Brand, at the Truman Memorial Building in Independence.
    Meet the Past - George Caleb Bingham
    Tuesday, August 7, 2012

    Truman Memorial Building
    416 W. Maple Ave., Independence

    In the mid-1800s Missouri was evolving from a rude frontier environment to a modern state. And capturing on canvas both the wilderness and advancing civilization was painter George Caleb Bingham, who resided in Independence for much of the 1860s.

  • Celebrate what would have been the 100th birthday of Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman as education reformer Virginia Walden Ford discusses the movement for school choice.
    Virginia Walden Ford - The Case for School Choice
    Monday, July 30, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    Celebrate what would have been the 100th birthday of Nobel Prize-winning economist Milton Friedman as education reformer Virginia Walden Ford discusses the movement for school choice.

    Friedman, the late Nobel Prize-winning economist, was a champion of capitalism and an advocate of school vouchers.

    Ford is the author of Voices, Choices, and Second Chances: How to Win the Battle to Bring Opportunity Scholarships to Your State.

  • Mark E. Neely, Jr., author of  Lincoln and the Triumph of a Nation, examines charges that Lincoln played fast and loose with the Constitution during his presidency.
    Mark E. Neely, Jr. - Abraham Lincoln
    Thursday, July 26, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    In pursuing the Civil War, did Abraham Lincoln play fast and loose with civil liberties?

    Pulitzer Prize winner Mark E. Neely, Jr., author of Lincoln and the Triumph of a Nation, rejects that idea and argues that Lincoln’s interpretation of the Constitution was well suited to tolerate the stresses of wartime.

    Neely is McCabe-Greer Professor of Civil War History at Pennsylvania State University.

    Co-presented with the Truman Library Institute; co-sponsored by KCUR’s Up to Date.

  • Be a part of the studio audience as KCPT tapes the latest installment of Meet the Past when Crosby Kemper III interviews Kansas City Star founder William Rockhill Nelson, as portrayed by Ray Starzmann.
    Meet the Past - William Rockhill Nelson
    Wednesday, July 25, 2012
    Central Library

    Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III returns for a conversation with Kansas City Star founder William Rockhill Nelson portrayed by Ray Starzmann. For 35 years Nelson ran The Star, crusading for civil improvements like parks and boulevards and finally willing his estate to the creation of what would become the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

  • Religious scholar Wilburn Stancil discusses the King James Bible, of which it has been written: "If everything else in our language should perish, it alone would suffice to show the extent of its beauty and power."
    Wilburn Stancil - From Ancient Texts to Literary Masterpiece
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012
    Central Library

    Wilburn Stancil discusses the King James Bible, of which it has been written: “If everything else in our language should perish, it alone would suffice to show the extent of its beauty and power.”

    The program complements Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible, an exhibit on display starting July 12 at the Central Library.

    Stancil is a professor of theology and religious studies at Rockhurst University.

  • Best-selling author ReShonda Tate Billingsley discusses The Secret She Kept, her new urban fiction novel about a marriage threatened by mental illness.
    ReShonda Tate Billingsley - The Secret She Kept
    Friday, July 13, 2012
    Central Library

    Best-selling urban fiction author ReShonda Tate Billingsley discusses and reads from The Secret She Kept, her new novel about a marriage threatened by mental illness.

    A Houston resident and the mother of three, Billingsley has written 23 books for adults and teens. She has been a reporter for the National Enquirer and an on-air anchor for television stations in Oklahoma City and Houston.

  • Biographer John Robert Greene examines the domestic issues, personality factors, and the vagaries of the 1992 campaign that confined George H.W. Bush to a single term.
    John Robert Greene - George H.W. Bush
    Thursday, July 12, 2012
    Plaza Branch

    How could a president have won a war and lost a re-election? For George H.W. Bush, being Commander-in-Chief during Desert Storm was not enough.

    John Robert Greene, author of The Presidency of George Bush, sets Bush’s presidency in the context of the Reagan years and reviews his foreign policy successes, such as the war with Iraq and an improved relationship with Russia, and nagging domestic issues such as economic recession, “Read My Lips,” and the Clarence Thomas Supreme Court appointment.

  • Be part of the studio audience as KCPT tapes the latest installment of Meet the Past when Crosby Kemper III interviews basketball inventor and former Kansas Jayhawks coach James Naismith, as portrayed by Bill Worley.
    Meet the Past - James Naismith
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012
    Central Library

    Meet the Past with Crosby Kemper III returns for a conversation with James Naismith, portrayed by Bill Worley.

    In 1891 Canadian minister and physical education teacher James Naismith invented a game that could be played indoors. He called it “basket ball” after the peach baskets which served as goals. A few years later he founded the University of Kansas basketball program (he worked for KU until his retirement in 1937 at the age of 76).