Event Video

All Library locations will be closed on Sunday, April 20, in observance of the Easter holiday.

To view a video recording of a previous Library special event, click the icon. The Library offers recordings only with the permission of the presenter.

  • Former Reagan budget director David Stockman explains how the American state — especially the Federal Reserve — has fallen prey to the politics of crony capitalism and the ideologies of fiscal stimulus, monetary central planning, and financial bailouts.
    The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America
    Wednesday, May 29, 2013
    Central Library

    David Stockman was the architect of the Reagan Revolution meant to restore sound money principles to the U.S. government, but the movement was derailed by politics, special interests, welfare, and warfare. Now he offers a fierce indictment of the American governmental-economic complex, reveals how the workings of free markets and democracy has long been under threat in America, and exposes a surprisingly nonpartisan catalog of corrupters and defenders.

  • Educator Michelle Rhee joins Library Director Crosby Kemper III for a public conversation about her ideas for improving public education in America and putting students first.
    Radical: Fighting to Put Students First
    Wednesday, May 22, 2013
    Plaza Branch

    Educator Michelle Rhee joins Library Director Crosby Kemper III for a public conversation about her new book Radical: Fighting to Put Students First and explains her ideas for improving public education by ensuring that laws, leaders, and politics are making students – not adults – their top priority.

  • Library Director Crosby Kemper III conducts a public conversation with Roshann Parris, president and CEO of Parris Communications Inc. and lead advance person on the White House Presidential Advance Team.
    A Conversation with Roshann Parris
    Wednesday, May 15, 2013
    Central Library

    Library Director Crosby Kemper III conducts a public conversation with Roshann Parris, president and CEO of the award-winning public relations firm Parris Communications Inc.

  • Author and economist John Blundell  looks at the lives of women such as Anne Hutchinson, Rosa Parks, Mercy Otis Warren, the Grimke sisters, and Alice Paul to refute the idea that women desire and benefit from big government.
    Ladies for Liberty: Women Who Made a Difference in American History
    Monday, May 13, 2013
    Central Library

    From Anne Hutchinson, whose doctrinal disputes with the Puritan clergy led to her expulsion from colonial Massachusetts, to Rosa Parks, who became a Civil Rights icon by refusing to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, bus, women have helped shape the American experience.

  • Michael Gillette discusses the life and legacy of Lady Bird Johnson, including her marriage to Lyndon Johnson, her careers as a congressional assistant and radio magnate, and her impressions of other first ladies.
    Lady Bird Johnson
    Thursday, May 9, 2013
    Plaza Branch

    Over nearly two decades Lady Bird Johnson recorded 47 oral history interviews with historian Michael Gillette and his colleagues at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library. Now Gillette details Johnson’s stories of marriage to a powerful man, of creating a media empire, and of encounters with first ladies like Edith Bolling Wilson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Bess Truman.

  • In 1886 four anarchists were hanged for bombing a Chicago labor rally and for 125 years their convictions have been seen as a miscarriage of justice. Now historian Timothy Messer-Kruse argues that the prosecution was solid, but the defense chose grandstanding over substance.
    The Trial of the Haymarket Anarchists
    Wednesday, May 1, 2013
    Central Library

    On May 4, 1886, a peaceful labor rally in Haymarket Square in Chicago erupted in violence. Four anarchists were convicted and hanged for their purported role in a bombing that resulted in the death of seven police officers and at least four civilians.

    For much of a century the executions of the anarchists were widely viewed as a miscarraige of justice. But in a discussion of his book The Trial of the Haymarket Anarchists: Terrorism and Justice in the Gilded Age, Timothy Messer-Kruse argues that the prosecution was solid. It was the anarchists’ lawyers who chose to ignore a sound defense and instead use the trial for political grandstanding.

  • Tama Matsuoka Wong, forager for the exclusive New York restaurant Daniel, discusses her new book Foraged Flavor: Finding Fabulous Ingredients in Your Backyard or Farmer’s Market.
    Foraged Flavor
    Thursday, April 25, 2013
    Central Library

    Tama Matsuoka Wong, forager for the exclusive New York restaurant Daniel, reveals how to locate, identify, and harvest wild plants for the dinner table. In Foraged Flavor: Finding Fabulous Ingredients in Your Backyard or Farmer’s Market, she and co-author Eddy Leroux not only reveal their favorite 71 foraged plants, but explore the best ways to prepare each ingredient for maximum flavor and nutrition. Foraged Flavor has been nominated for a 2013 James Beard Foundation Book Award.

  • Television newsman Jim Lehrer and author Lee Banville join Library director Crosby Kemper III for a public conversation that provides insight into the presidential debate moments that shaped history.
    A Conversation with Jim Lehrer
    Monday, April 22, 2013
    Plaza Branch

    Television newsman Jim Lehrer has presided over 12 presidential and vice-presidential debates and written about them in his 2011 memoir Tension City. Now, MacNeil/Lehrer Production has published Debating Our Destiny, a multimedia-enhanced ebook by University of Montana journalism professor Lee Banville on the history of presidential debates.

  • Military historian Gregory S. Hospodor examines the year-long effort by a Union army – under the command of Ulysses S. Grant – to take Vicksburg, the Mississippi River stronghold that Jefferson Davis called “the nail head that holds the South’s two halves together.”
    Vicksburg: Grant’s Masterpiece
    Thursday, April 18, 2013
    Central Library

    Military historian Gregory S. Hospodor examines the year-long effort by a Union army -- under the command of Ulysses S. Grant -- to take Vicksburg, the Mississippi River stronghold that Jefferson Davis called “the nail head that holds the South’s two halves together.”

  • Author William Hogeland explains how debt, speculation, foreclosures, protests, and crackdowns made us a nation.
    Founding Finance: How Debt, Speculation, Foreclosures, Protests and Crackdowns Made Us a Nation
    Wednesday, April 17, 2013
    Central Library

    Arguments over taxation and “constitutional conservatism” are nothing new, William Hogeland points out. His new book brings to life the violent conflicts over economics, class, and finance that played directly into the hardball politics of forming the nation and ratifying the Constitution — conflicts that still affect our politics, legislation, and national debate.