Adolf Dehn

Haitian Caryatids

In ancient Greek architecture, caryatids are sculptures of draped female figures used in place of columns or pillars. These female structures often supported entablatures on their heads and in doing so, represented their strength and significance to the health and prosperity of society. Since the neck would otherwise be the thinnest and weakest part of the sculpture, caryatids often had thick, elaborate hairstyles that extended the length of their neck to reinforce the weight overhead.