Central Library

This is an enlarged poster of a drawing of a downtown Kansas City block by Charles Graham. Beneath the image reads "NINTH STREET, KANSAS CITY, LOOKING WEST FROM WALNUT STREET-Drawn by Charles Graham- [SEE PAGE 451]." One gets a sense of what the artist may have seen while looking in this direction: a bustling city street alive with streetcars, patrons, and businesses. The buildings that extend the edge of the frame emphasize their verticality and provide a view contemplating the health and progression of the city.

Camille Pissarro was born on 10 July 1830 on the island of St. Thomas to Frederick and Rachel Manzano de Pissarro. Pissarro was one of the most renowned French Impressionist painters of the 19th century. During his formative years Pissarrro studied at the Savary Academy in Passy near Paris. While in school Pissarro developed a solid grounding towards painting and drawing, and was instructed by Monsieur Savary to observe nature as part of his artist discipline. Pissarro returned to St. Thomas where he drew in his free time.

The slogan "Heat Up, Cool Down" with the quite literal image of a gushing fire hydrant ablaze provides an exciting visual representation of the improvisational characteristic common to the jazz musical genre. According to this poster, 1983 was a "hot" year for the Kansas City Jazz Festival featuring artists Count Basie, Ella Fitzgerald, George Benson, and Oscar Peterson. Events started August 27th and concluded September 4th with concerts, birthday parties, and luncheons every day.

Taken from the gallery label of the original work on display at the Nelson-Atkins: "Hollywood resulted from Thomas Hart Benton's Life magazine-sponsored excursion to Tinseltown in the summer of 1937. The composition unites various aspects of movie-making, revealing Benton's fascination with what he called "the machinery of the industry" responsible for cinematic effects.

This Howard Miller Presidential Collection Grandfather Clock is a free standing wooden floor clock. The clock has Windsor Cherry finish with crotch mahogany on the pediment and multi tier base. The white dial is accented with a polished brass bezel and Roman numerals. The case of the clock exhibits sculpted side columns with carved column caps, curved glass on the locking front door, and beveled glass on sides and front. The clock features an ornate golden pendulum bob and chimes. The right of the clock face contains the following text: WHITE ST. MICH WESTM. SILENT.

Ide Collar Company of Troy NY, was a popular men's clothier in the early twentieth century. This print captures a store front that displays the wears of Ide Collar Company. Iconic to Kansas City is that this site is located at the haberdashery that was owned by Truman and Jacobson. Harry S. Truman and his friend, Eddie Jacobson owned a haberdashery at 104 W. 12th St., Kansas City, Missouri. The name of the store was the Truman and Jacobson Haberdashery, located at 12th and Baltimore (104 West 12th) Kansas City, Missouri.

Warner Bros. 1964's release of the Italian production film "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City". The plot of this film centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton (Paul Piaget) and the sheriff (Fernando Casanova) seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. The predominant feature, in this full color illustration, is that of two gunslingers amidst a gunfight. The protagonist, Sheriff Paul, is depicted in the upper right, firing on the antagonist, purportedly the character Frank Dalton in the lower left of the illustration.

The plot of "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City", a Warner Bros. release of the Italian production film directed by Agustín Navarro, centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton (Paul Piaget) and the sheriff (Fernando Casanova) as they seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. This poster features the title of the film in a striking film noir font over a black and white silhouette of the sheriff. To the right a watercolored film still of Dalton fiercely interrogating a woman who cowers away from him.

Warner Bros. 1964's release of the Italian production film "Il Vendicatore Di Kansas City". The plot of this film centers around the gunfighter Frank Dalton, portrayed by Paul Piaget, and the sheriff, portrayed by Fernando Casanova, seek the real culprit of a murder pinned on Dalton's sister. The predominant feature, in this full color depiction, details Fernando Casanova, disarming Paul Piaget. Casanova appears casting Piaget's gun away, as Piaget is raising his arms in surrender.

This print features a young Black girl seen wearing a sorority blouse and red pencil skirt. A line of presumed family and friends extends from detail in the foreground into the haze of the background. Although in close proximity to one another, each figure appears to stand alone, collaged into the young girl's memory of those who have influenced her in life. As she steps forward, breaking away from her system of influence, she looks back and considers their impact as she advances on her next journey.

This print is essentially three squared sections within one another. The outermost section is made up of a fine blue and red checkerboard pattern, drawing into the middle section which has the same pattern enlarged four times. At the center is a solid red square, many times larger than those around it, that offers a quietness in the center of the dizzying commotion. Color theory and Optical Illusion Art psychology account for this effect and give substance to the work's title, "Into Chaos".

The marble chair was dedicated to James M. Greenwood (1836-1914) by his wife. The original Kansas City Public Library building was constructed under Greenwood's direction and he was committed to making its services available to the public for the rest of his life. He served on the Kansas City Public School board as a superintendent for nearly four decades. Through his progressive programs and vision, Greenwood became highly regarded in educational spheres. Engraved in the back of the chair are the words: "A memorial to James M.

Promotional poster of Columbia’s 1944 film "Kansas City Kitty". The plot of this film centers around Polly Jasper (Joan Davis) a charming wisecracking piano teacher. Polly gets involved with some shady music publishers named Latham & Clark. The publishers sell their business to Polly and her friend Eileen Hasbrook (Jane Frazee). One hour before the sale, the company was sued for the legitimacy of the song “Kansas City Kitty”. Polly happens to be obsessed with her music loving dentist Dr. Henry Talbot (Erik Rolph) who is not quite as romantically inclined.

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman. In blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, he incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme who gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. This poster captures a film still of Rolfe getting stopped by the police in the same van implicated in the crime. He sticks his head out of the van window with an incredulous look on his face.

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

This print depicts a grid of various industries in Kansas City in 1883 as printed on the lower border of the matting. The print offers exterior and interior in-use accounts of many of the industries. Of those featured are the S. E. Scott & Co. Real Estate Office; the Journal Building with views of the composing room, press room, office, and editorial room; The Deere Mansur & Co. Farm Machinery building; the McCord & Nave Merchantile Co.; the Union Depot; The Geo. Y. Smith & Co.

The Kansas City Art Deco Society was founded by Bill McDevitt in 1996. McDevitt's goal was to "preserve the bold geometric patterns and streamlined designs that comprised the area's signature architecture in the years between the World Wars" (-Kansas City Business Journal). This poster serves as a graphic token of those designs. A black san serif font overlays a gold border. At the center, a female figure stands in a presentation stance in front of a highly stylized Art Deco structure. This central image is most likely a still from a film.

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

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