Central Library

Cosmic Circles (ii)

Gabriella Polony Mountain's work includes four major themes. The first three themes are clearly recognizable as the Cosmos, Nature, and Figural works with the fourth theme encompassing history, philosophy, and culture. In her life as an artist, Polony Mountain worked with many different medium including mosaics, weavings, sculpture, stained glass, and repousse. Repousse, or repoussage, is a metalworking technique in which a malleable metal is shaped by hammering the reverse side of a sheet a metal. On the other side, a low relief design is revealed.

Cosmic Pillow (i)

Gabriella Polony Mountain's work includes four major themes. The first three themes are clearly recognizable as the Cosmos, Nature, and Figural works with the fourth theme encompassing history, philosophy, and culture. In her life as an artist, Polony Mountain worked with many different medium including mosaics, weavings, sculpture, stained glass, and repousse. Weaving is a technique used to make textiles by interlacing thread.

Cosmic Pillow (ii)

Gabriella Polony Mountain's work includes four major themes. The first three themes are clearly recognizable as the Cosmos, Nature, and Figural works with the fourth theme encompassing history, philosophy, and culture. In her life as an artist, Polony Mountain worked with many different medium including mosaics, weavings, sculpture, stained glass, and repousse. Weaving is a technique used to make textiles by interlacing thread.

Coupe de Cenotaphe de Newton

Étienne-Louis Boullée was a French neoclassical architect whose designs have had a lasting impact on modern architecture. The paperwork accompanying this piece reads: "Sublime Spirit! Vast and profound genius! Divine being! Accept the homage of my weak talents... Oh, Newton!" With these words, French architect and designer Étienne-Louis Boullée dedicated his design for an imaginary cenotaph (empty tomb) in honor of the English physicist Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727). Like many intellectuals of his day, Boullée was fascinated by Newtonian physics.

Cram's Superior Map of Kansas

This sizable map was likely created by George F. Cram who served in the U.S. Army during the American Civil War. After the war ended, Cram joined his uncle Rufus Blanchard's Evanston map business in 1867. Cram's map depicts populations in cities and towns throughout the state of Kansas as well as the distances between railway stations.

Cram's Superior Map of Missouri

This sizable map was created by George F. Cram who served in the U.S. Army during the American Civil War. After the war ended, Cram joined his uncle Rufus Blanchard's Evanston map business in 1867. Cram's map offers a complete depiction of the railway systems that passed through Missouri and is believed to have been created in 1906-1907. In the lower left hand corner is a key explaining the map's contents including census data, counties, county seats, cities, post offices, railroad stations, villages, etc.

Damage and Debris After the Flood

This image documents the immensity of debris left by the Great Flood of 1951. The vantage point appears to come from a western area looking eastward toward the West Bottoms as the original John Deere building located at 13th and Hickory Street can vaguely be seen in the distance. Taking up roughly three-quarters of the image foreground is a mess of barrels, wood, and sections of fencing and roofing. Aside from the bridge and the river itself, there appears to be no end to the expanse to the mass of debris in the photograph.

Down the Road

Earl B. Lewis is an artist and award-winning illustrator who has illustrated over 50 children's books. He works primarily in watercolor depicting stories about the lives of young black children and their struggle in race encounters, children in hospitals, and families. In this painting a mother, father, and child walk down an unpaved road visiting with one another. The father wears all denim with suspenders while the mother wears a long floral dress, completing a traditional image of a working-class family. The child wears a pair of denim overalls and holds a basket of apples.

Dr. William Stone Woods

This reproduction print of a photograph depicts Dr. William Stone Woods (1840-1917) in a traditional three quarter length portrait pose looking bemused. Woods had a long and variant career in the Midwestern United States. He was first a medical doctor trained at the St. Louis Medical College and the Jefferson Medical College. Not long after he became a practicing physician, Woods uptook a wholesale grocery business that supplied workers employed along the Union Pacific Railroad between Nebraska and Utah.

Dragons Door

Gabriella Polony Mountain's work includes four major themes. The first three themes are clearly recognizable as the Cosmos, Nature, and Figural works with the fourth theme encompassing history, philosophy, and culture. In her life as an artist, Polony Mountain worked with many different medium including mosaics, weavings, sculpture, stained glass, and repousse. Repousse, or repoussage, is a metalworking technique in which a malleable metal is shaped by hammering the reverse side of a sheet a metal. On the other side, a low relief design is revealed.

Ebb and Flow #1

In Berman’s mind, knowledge and information flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes that phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the first of the series, shades of orange emerge from the bottom of the piece overlapping shades of pink and one stroke of bold green to suggest an upward movement carried on by the next piece.

Ebb and Flow #10

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the tenth and final piece of the series, cool blues seem to pass over the white space like streams of air, creating a calmness appropriate for the end of a journey.

Ebb and Flow #3

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the third of the series, vibrant blue, yellow , and red colors are mitigated by subsequent neutral layers trend in a downward motion toward the next piece.

Ebb and Flow #4

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the fourth of the series, vast hues of blue and green create deep wells of visual attention punctuated with yellows and oranges. Within each frame, the layering of color creates new shapes and hues that add to the overall flow of the work.

Ebb and Flow #5

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the fifth of the series, wide bands of cool colors encapsulate streaks of orange and red near the center, altogether leaving little white space on the paper.

Ebb and Flow #6

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the sixth of the series, a vibrant pool of blue appears to center the piece as other streaks of cool-toned color echo off of it. Within each frame, the layering of color creates new shapes and hues that add to the overall flow of the work.

Ebb and Flow #7

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the seventh of the series, the color current appears to bow upward and is dominated by vibrant blues with a few streaks of yellow. Within each frame, the layering of color creates new shapes and hues that add to the overall flow of the work.

Ebb and Flow #8

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the eighth of the series, dense layering of greens, blues, oranges, and browns takes up most of the print, continuing a surge of movement from one piece to the next.

Ebb and Flow #9

In Berman’s mind, information and knowledge flow like an unseen current between people and media in the library environment. This print is one of ten that visualizes this phenomenon in the ebb and flow of color across them. While the series has a cohesive visual effect when displayed together, each individual unit has its own unique characteristics. In the ninth of the series, underlying layers nearly suggest a landscape canyon scene washed over by currents of blue and green.

El Vendedor de Alcatraces

Diego Rivera was a famed artists in the Mexican Muralists, a group active throughout the 1900s whose work explored the social and political implications of Mexican life after the 1910 Revolution. Rivera often depicted themes of Mexico's history and social issues using strife as well as triumph to draw a line from the past to the present. In so doing, he presented nationalist themes that he (and the Mexican government) hoped would encourage unity and reinforce pride in Mexican civil society.

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