Central Library

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman who, in blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme but gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. What happens thereafter incites the curiosity lead on by the text on the poster, which reads: "The true solution to this shocking crime still hasn't been entered on police records!!".

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman who, in blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme but gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. What happens thereafter incites the curiosity lead on by the text on the poster, which reads: "The true solution to this shocking crime still hasn't been entered on police records!!".

The Convention Hall was a convention center located in Kansas City, Missouri. The original Convention Hall was designed by Frederick E. Hill, and opened on February 22, 1899. This center was destroyed by a fire on April 4th, 1900. The center was redesigned by Hill, and re-opened within a 90 days after construction began. This concentrated effort was labeled the "Kansas City Spirit". The Hall hosted the 1900 Democratic National Convention and the 1928 Republican National Convention.

This is an ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) photograph of Kansas City taken in July of 2006. NASA created the ASTER to take "high-resolution (15 to 90 square meters per pixel) images of the Earth in 14 different wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, ranging from visible to thermal infrared light." Scientists use ASTER data to create detailed maps of land surface temperature, emissivity, reflectance, and elevation. The images produced are scientifically engaged and visually captivating.

This drawing focuses on the architectural detail surrounding the building's title, First National Bank, which is engraved in stone. The building, now the Central Branch of the Kansas City Public Library, is known for its ionic order columns emphasized in this drawing. The columns support the entablature, which includes the architrave, the frieze, and the cornice. Most of the detail in the drawing fades with distance, but not the American flag mounted on the rooftop.

Ariel view of the Kansas City skyline. The sepia toned print of the skyline shows a unique view of developing downtown Kansas City. This metropolitan view contains many iconic structures including the Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City City Hall, Oak Tower, also called the Bell Telephone Building, Kansas City Power and Light Building , and the AT&T building amid the urban downtown landscape. The downtown area experienced a revival in the early 2000s and the success of the development can still be seen today.

This photograph offers a view of the Kansas City, Missouri skyline at sunset. Recognizable are the Oak Tower, City Hall, and Kansas City Power and Light buildings which are integral to the famed skyline. However, some of the more modern buildings included in the contemporary skyline known today are missing, suggesting this photograph is older and was perhaps taken between the 1960s through the 1990s. The railways of the West Bottoms cross the lower portion of the photograph and overpasses follow suit above them. The city itself lies beyond and beneath a beautiful expanse of clouds.

This is a poster that reads "Kansas City / Paris of the Plains / 1928-1938" across an almost water-marked image of a woman dressed in popular flapper attire. Her striking pose seems to suggest the appeal that the rising urban area had despite the economic depression ravaging the rest of the country. Due to looser laws surrounding prohibition, the city's nightlife boomed and was spared economically as well. Kansas City has long been called the "Paris of the Plains" due to its system of boulevards, many water fountains, and strong cultural engagement.

Promotional poster for Kansas City Area Transportation Authority marketing 'DIMETOWN', a ten cent ride program to various parts of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The enlarged poster is patriotically colored, the lettering is mostly blue, with the exception of DIMETOWN which is blue bordered containing a red and white interior, and a white background.

Based in Kansas City, Irma Starr is a world-renowned potter who creates collectible works of art that are modeled after the 17th-century slipware style of pottery.This beautifully and meticulously rendered ceramic plate holds the Kansas City Central Library building as its focal point.Thus placing further emphasis on the Library as the city's oldest cultural institution. On the outer lip of the plate are two images.To the left, a portrait of the Public Library's founder James M. Greenwood.To the right, Greenwood’s white marble memorial chair located at the Central Branch.

Edward Degas is regarded as one of the founders of the Impressionist movement in 19th-century painting. However, he regarded himself as a realist or independent due to his pursuit of atypical subject matter and his tendency to paint from unusual vantage points and with asymmetrical compositions. He painted scenes of leisure activities of modern life, such as ballet dancers in the 1870s that eventually comprised perhaps his most memorable series of work.

Claude Monet was the founder of the French Impressionist movement which sought to express one's perception of nature through essence and the effect of light on forms. Plein air painting was the chosen subject matter of the movement, but when figures such as this one arose they were depicted in the same style which left details open and gestural. Accordingly unrecognizable, the woman pictured here is Suzanne Hoschedé, daughter of Claude Monet's second wife, Alice Hoschedé. The painting was rendered from a low viewpoint, making Ms.

This elegant grandfather clock contains a large round clock face and oval body atop a base with scroll and leaf ornament and bun feet. The clock has a beautiful Windsor cherry wood finish with hues of antique gold throughout the carved details. The clock face features dual-tone, metallic and gold hands with Arabic numerals beneath a convex glass crystal. A leaf-tip pattern surrounds the clock face as well as the lower glass door, framing the hanging composition of weights and large, round pendulum.

Lehighton Letters is a series of works created for public libraries worldwide by found object sculptor Richard J. Hinger. Works from Lehighton Letters that he named after the artists Pennsylvania birthplace are on exhibition in London, New York City, Paris, Washington D.C. and 60 other public libraries including the Central Branch of the Kansas City Public Library. This work is made from salvaged signage letters and recycled objects like soda cans, toys, toothbrushes, and bottle caps inlaid in a resin material with a textured application.

Artist Eugene L. Daub portrays a scene simultaneously in pause and in motion with this relief sculpture. Lewis and Clark look out over their expedition team with their journal and sextant (navigational tool) contemplating the expedition to come while a band of men load and heave large wooden canoes into the water. Sacagawea looks past the scene in the same direction with child fastened to her back. The wind blows the fabric of her dress in the same direction as her gaze emphasizing the still capture of a chaotic moment.

This bronze sculpture of the Lewis and Clark Expedition team includes Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, York, Sacagawea, and Lewis's Newfoundland dog, Seaman (listed on the artist's website). The group rests atop a rocky base while looking out in all directions and observing what lies ahead. Lewis and Clark are in the midst of consulting their instruments and each other. The team stands alone, facing what the viewer's imagination reads as the uncharted Frontier in the space around the sculpture. They appear cautious, yet brave, and together convey the essence of discovery.

This map is of the Greater Kansas City Metro and Suburbs region. Text in the bottom righthand corner reads the company's slogan "Everything in Maps." The Gallup Map & Art Company was founded in Kansas City in 1875 and is one of the oldest operating cartography companies in the United States. A later reproduction of the same map can be found on their website and is listed as an "antique map featuring the streetcars" (GallupMap.com).

This map provides a visual understanding of Kansas City's urban landscape with bright color blocking to denote major districts packed with extensive quantitative detail. The legend includes house numbers, city limits, county lines, railroads, public buildings, hospitals, county highways, US highways, interstates, shopping centers, parks, cemeteries, golf courses, and an index of the major corporations, or districts that comprise the city.

The Kansas City Stockyards operated in the West Bottoms of Kansas City from 1871 to 1991. It was the second largest stockyards in the nation and one of Kansas City’s most important industries. Three separate maps comprise a whole view of the stockyards. Reading from top to bottom, each map is numbered Plate One, Plate Two and Plate Three. The maps were created circa 1907, from map makers Tuttle and Pike. Plate One details "N 1/2 Sec. 6, Tp. 49, R 33.". Two of the neighborhoods included in this area are Coates and Hopkins Addition. Plate Two details "S 1/2 Sec. 6, Tp.

This map provides a color-blocked depiction of Kansas City on a grid. The map used for this print was presumably much older since the key at the top identifies horse and cable roads as well as steam roads throughout the city. Steam roads refers to the roads that were created to accommodate the steam powered vehicles developed in the 1800s. The Missouri side, in yellow, features most of the grid as well as the Missouri Pacific, Chicago & Alton, and Kansas City Sunbelt railroads. They trail into the Kansas side, which is pink, and features more of the grid and the Shawnee Reserve.

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