Central Library

James M. Greenwood Memorial Chair

The marble chair was dedicated to James M. Greenwood (1836-1914) by his wife. The original Kansas City Public Library building was constructed under Greenwood's direction and he was committed to making its services available to the public for the rest of his life. He served on the Kansas City Public School board as a superintendent for nearly four decades. Through his progressive programs and vision, Greenwood became highly regarded in educational spheres. Engraved in the back of the chair are the words: "A memorial to James M.

Joan Davis in "Kansas City Kitty"

Promotional poster of Columbia’s 1944 film "Kansas City Kitty". The plot of this film centers around Polly Jasper (Joan Davis) a charming wisecracking piano teacher. Polly gets involved with some shady music publishers named Latham & Clark. The publishers sell their business to Polly and her friend Eileen Hasbrook (Jane Frazee). One hour before the sale, the company was sued for the legitimacy of the song “Kansas City Kitty”. Polly happens to be obsessed with her music loving dentist Dr. Henry Talbot (Erik Rolph) who is not quite as romantically inclined.

John Payne in "Kansas City Confidential"

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman. In blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, he incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme who gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. This poster captures a film still of Rolfe getting stopped by the police in the same van implicated in the crime. He sticks his head out of the van window with an incredulous look on his face.

Kansas City (1)

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Kansas City (2)

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Kansas City and Industries 1883

This print depicts a grid of various industries in Kansas City in 1883 as printed on the lower border of the matting. The print offers exterior and interior in-use accounts of many of the industries. Of those featured are the S. E. Scott & Co. Real Estate Office; the Journal Building with views of the composing room, press room, office, and editorial room; The Deere Mansur & Co. Farm Machinery building; the McCord & Nave Merchantile Co.; the Union Depot; The Geo. Y. Smith & Co.

Kansas City Art Deco Society

The Kansas City Art Deco Society was founded by Bill McDevitt in 1996. McDevitt's goal was to "preserve the bold geometric patterns and streamlined designs that comprised the area's signature architecture in the years between the World Wars" (-Kansas City Business Journal). This poster serves as a graphic token of those designs. A black san serif font overlays a gold border. At the center, a female figure stands in a presentation stance in front of a highly stylized Art Deco structure. This central image is most likely a still from a film.

Kansas City Bomber (i)

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

Kansas City Bomber (ii)

This poster features a larger-than-life Raquel Welch in her role as K.C. Carr in the 1972 film "Kansas City Bomber". This film was a drama about the merciless social dynamics behind the scenes in the sport of Roller Derby. Raquel Welch, or K.C. Carr, plays a single mother and derby star who leaves her team in Kansas City to play for the Portland Loggers in Oregon. Work, romance, and deceit plague her experience with her new team until K.C. Carr realizes her fierce independence is the key to her success on and off the track.

Kansas City Confidential (1)

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman who, in blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme but gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. What happens thereafter incites the curiosity lead on by the text on the poster, which reads: "The true solution to this shocking crime still hasn't been entered on police records!!".

Kansas City Confidential (2)

Kansas City Confidential tells the tale of Timothy Foster, a corrupt ex-policeman who, in blackmailing three criminals to complete a robbery, incidentally implicates a man unrelated to his scheme but gets mistaken for Foster by the authorities. The man, Joe Rolfe, eventually gets the charges against him dropped but goes to track down Foster and the original criminals in a fit of anger. What happens thereafter incites the curiosity lead on by the text on the poster, which reads: "The true solution to this shocking crime still hasn't been entered on police records!!".

Kansas City Convention Hall

The Convention Hall was a convention center located in Kansas City, Missouri. The original Convention Hall was designed by Frederick E. Hill, and opened on February 22, 1899. This center was destroyed by a fire on April 4th, 1900. The center was redesigned by Hill, and re-opened within a 90 days after construction began. This concentrated effort was labeled the "Kansas City Spirit". The Hall hosted the 1900 Democratic National Convention and the 1928 Republican National Convention.

Kansas City from Space

This is an ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) photograph of Kansas City taken in July of 2006. NASA created the ASTER to take "high-resolution (15 to 90 square meters per pixel) images of the Earth in 14 different wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, ranging from visible to thermal infrared light." Scientists use ASTER data to create detailed maps of land surface temperature, emissivity, reflectance, and elevation. The images produced are scientifically engaged and visually captivating.

Kansas City Project: "First National Bank"

This drawing focuses on the architectural detail surrounding the building's title, First National Bank, which is engraved in stone. The building, now the Central Branch of the Kansas City Public Library, is known for its ionic order columns emphasized in this drawing. The columns support the entablature, which includes the architrave, the frieze, and the cornice. Most of the detail in the drawing fades with distance, but not the American flag mounted on the rooftop.

Kansas City Skyline

Ariel view of the Kansas City skyline. The sepia toned print of the skyline shows a unique view of developing downtown Kansas City. This metropolitan view contains many iconic structures including the Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City City Hall, Oak Tower, also called the Bell Telephone Building, Kansas City Power and Light Building , and the AT&T building amid the urban downtown landscape. The downtown area experienced a revival in the early 2000s and the success of the development can still be seen today.

Kansas City, Missouri Skyline

This photograph offers a view of the Kansas City, Missouri skyline at sunset. Recognizable are the Oak Tower, City Hall, and Kansas City Power and Light buildings which are integral to the famed skyline. However, some of the more modern buildings included in the contemporary skyline known today are missing, suggesting this photograph is older and was perhaps taken between the 1960s through the 1990s. The railways of the West Bottoms cross the lower portion of the photograph and overpasses follow suit above them. The city itself lies beyond and beneath a beautiful expanse of clouds.

Kansas City: Paris of the Plains

This is a poster that reads "Kansas City / Paris of the Plains / 1928-1938" across an almost water-marked image of a woman dressed in popular flapper attire. Her striking pose seems to suggest the appeal that the rising urban area had despite the economic depression ravaging the rest of the country. Due to looser laws surrounding prohibition, the city's nightlife boomed and was spared economically as well. Kansas City has long been called the "Paris of the Plains" due to its system of boulevards, many water fountains, and strong cultural engagement.

KC Union Station-Winter

A marbled navy blue frame and broad white matting center this detailed painting by Independence, Missouri native George Lightfoot, titled "K.C. Union Station-Winter". The print's perspective places the station at a distance from the viewer and nestled below the surrounding city skyline. Covered in snow, the Union Station building appears grand and still save for the family building a snowman on the lawn facing it. The small size of the print itself, which is 5 3/4 inches long by 4 1/4 inches wide, encourages the viewer to dial in on the minute details that characterize the artist's style.

KCATA 'DIMETOWN'

Promotional poster for Kansas City Area Transportation Authority marketing 'DIMETOWN', a ten cent ride program to various parts of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The enlarged poster is patriotically colored, the lettering is mostly blue, with the exception of DIMETOWN which is blue bordered containing a red and white interior, and a white background.

KCPL Commemorative Plate

Based in Kansas City, Irma Starr is a world-renowned potter who creates collectible works of art that are modeled after the 17th-century slipware style of pottery. This beautifully and meticulously rendered ceramic plate holds the Kansas City Central Library building as its focal point, thus placing further emphasis on the Library as the city's oldest cultural institution. On the outer lip of the plate are two images. To the left, a portrait of the Public Library's founder James M. Greenwood. To the right, Greenwood’s white marble memorial chair located at the Central Branch.

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