Central Library

As documented in the historical account from the Missouri Valley Special Collections at the Kansas City Public Library, The town of Westport, in 1838, stood near the western edge of the American frontier and served as a disembarking point for traders following the Santa Fe Trail to present-day New Mexico, then a part of Mexico. To reach Westport from the east, traders traveled by river to a natural rock landing near the junction of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers and then trekked four miles south to Westport. This is an original 1885 map of Westport Missouri, by Charles C. Spalding, C.E.

"Missouri Ave" is an oil on canvas landscape painting in the Impressionist style. It depicts a view of the Missouri Avenue, located in the North East district of Kansas City, Missouri. The painting showcases multi-story buildings on either side of a street view with both automobiles and pedestrians. Businesses are visible on the left hand side of the work by the store front signs of "Tailor" and "Loans." "Missouri Ave" is an original painting signed by the artist.

This map color codes the geological mines throughout Jackson County with an accompanying legend. The legend includes the following mineral deposits: Alluvium, Iola Limestone, Chanute Shale, Drum LS, Cherryvale Sh, Winterset LS, Galesburg Sh, Bethany Falls LS, Ladore Sh, Hertha LS, Pleasanton Sh. The following areas are noted for each mineral: Lansing, Kansas City, Pleasanton, Henrietta, and Cherokee. The cartographic authors are noted as W.E. McCourt and J. Bennett, and other text further indicates H. A. Buehler as the State Geologist.

Jiří Votruba is an artist from the Czech-Republic who works primarily with strong, flat graphics and primary colors. The illustration depicts the great composer Mozart, or at least his feet and legs, standing over the city skyline of Prague. Votruba's illustrations are popular in use with literature for children and often include imagery of classical composers and historical Prague, as seen here (votruba.cz). The artist is otherwise very interested in the attractivity of consumer society, likely owing to the colors and pop art-esque style that characterizes his work.

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 american dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all american family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 American dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all-American family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

This work is an oversized print model of a ten-dollar bill as printed by the National Bank of Commerce in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1907. As opposed to the centrally-oriented bills of the present day, this bill frames the United States' twenty-fifth president, William McKinley, on the left-hand side. Nearer the center of the bill is the bolded statement "The National Bank of Commerce of Kansas City, Missouri will pay to the bearer on demand ten dollars" with numerous bank note insignia across the rest of the bill.

Covering what was "New in Kansas City", this article mentions the installment of the Pickwick-Greyhound bus terminal. At the time, it was the world's largest and its placement in Kansas City was decided by the city's central location in the country. The city had highways extend in every direction, and had experienced steady growth and prosperity. The article markets Kansas City as "unexcelled by any other metropolis" as an industrial center because of its transportation facilities. Next to these statements are sketched illustrations of the bus station from ground and aerial views.

This original print is 41 out of a series of 50, signed at dated by Henri-George Adam in 1956. Seven rectangular fields arrange to comprise an angular abstract composition. Each field has a base layer of hatching executed with grid-like precision. Within the fields, abstract shapes layer over one another creating new shapes altogether with the resulting varying opacities. A diamond emerges from the composition along with prominent horizontal striations in the upper register.

Diane Romanello, born in New York on 1944, is a self-taught artist whose landscape paintings are characterized by an aesthetic of beauty and charm, inviting the viewer into an idealized naturalistic world. The scene captures an idyllic view from a wooden deck with railing and stairs that lead directly to a beach. This picturesque setting conjures to mind a serene day where calm waters lap against a white sand beach. The surf stretches into the horizon, with some land features that border the furthest point. Three boats are are depicted further out to sea.

"Kansas City, Missouri," is a poster print of a night time panoramic view of the Kansas City downtown skyline. The following description is written at the bottom of the print: "This panoramic photograph was taken by Christopher Gjevre and features a twilight view of downtown Kansas City." Located on the western edge of Missouri along the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, Kansas City was and is the marketing and and shipping center for a vast agricultural region. The tallest building in the print is One Kansas City Place.

This large map depicts a "bird's eye" panoramic view of Kansas City's West Bottoms, namely the stockyards, packing, and wholesale houses. While being informational, the map also conveys the vitality of this district in the early history of the city emphasizing the West Bottoms as a confluence point of trade and commerce. Each street, building, and railroad track appears accounted for with minute detail and accuracy. Starting in the late 19th century, "bird's eye" was a popular point of view to render cities despite air travel not being possible.

This is a large "bird's eye" panoramic view of Kansas City's West Bottoms, namely the stockyards, packing, and wholesale houses. While being informational, the map also conveys the vitality of this district early in the city's history, as the West Bottoms were a confluence point of trade and commerce. Each street, building, and railroad track appears accounted for with minute detail and accuracy. Starting in the late 19th century, "Bird's eye" was a popular point of view to render cities despite air travel not being possible yet.

This sculpture of American folklore lumberjack, Paul Bunyan, is fittingly carved out of a tree trunk. The sculpture maintains the cylindrical shape of a tree trunk. Bunyan appears aghast with his mouth and eyes wide open. He has a head of stylized hair represented by rivet holes that condense near his face and expand around the back of his head. His beard, made with deep-cut narrow lines, fuse into the hide of Babe the Blue Ox beneath him. Babe's body wraps around the sculpture and his head emerges to the left of Bunyan's beard, but in lower relief than Bunyan himself.

During Hollywood’s silent screen era, Japanese film actor Sessue Hayakawa rivaled Douglas Fairbanks, Charlie Chaplin and John Barrymore in popularity. Hayakawa was one of the highest paid Hollywood stars of his time, making over $5,000 a week in 1915, then two million a year through his own production company during the 1920s. Handsome and flamboyant, Hayakawa gave lavish Hollywood parties that would become legendary. Hayakawa was Paramount’s first choice for the role of the "The Sheik" that launched Rudolph Valentino’s career in 1918.

The figure in this study is speculated to be Grace Darling. Grace Darling was a silent film actress best known for her leading role in "Beatrice Fairfax" (1916) as Beatrice herself, the editor of a love advice column. The film's significance comes with it being inspired by "Ask Beatrice Fairfax" the first newspaper advice column of its kind introduced in 1898 by Mary Miller, and as it was of the first film series consisting of 15 independent episodes that aired weekly. This shot captures Darling in the opening of stage curtains standing against a burlap-sheathed wall.

The identity of this man is unknown, but his persona is not. He is dressed here as the archetypal French painter in an exaggerated beret, precise mustache, painters frock, paintbrush, and wooden paint palette. Although there is no paint on his materials, one can assume that he is in the midst of working on the piece hanging on the wall behind him. He stands poised with brush to palette and head turned to the side, offering a dramatic profile of his character.

This photograph is of an elderly man seated outside of Hixon's studio. The man is purportedly a former KC Star newspaper vendor. He appears worn with disheveled hair imprinted by a hat once worn, long wiry beard, and deeply wrinkled hands. He also appears to be resting for a moment as he has closed his eyes and propped his chin on his chest. One can presume the number of stories and knowledge he has garnished over time which may explicate his worn disposition, but one can expect none less than a wealth of wisdom to accompany it too.

Asa Yoelson-Al Jolson was born in Lithuania. He changed his name to Al Jolson once he started to perform. Jolson was a celebrated singer and dancer on Broadway prior to gaining worldwide fame as the star of "The Jazz Singer". This 1927 film signaled the transition from silent pictures to sound. Known as "The World's Greatest Entertainer," Jolson's legacy is complicated by the modern-day controversy over his frequent use of blackface. Jolson extended his career by becoming a popular recording star and the singing host of radio shows.

Born in Lithuania, Asa Yoelson-Al Jolson, known professionally as Al Jolson was a celebrated singer and dancer. He was a Broadway attraction prior to gaining worldwide fame as the star of "The Jazz Singer." This 1927 film signaled the transition from silent pictures to sound. Jolson was known as "The World's Greatest Entertainer;" however, his legacy is complicated by the modern-day controversy over his frequent use of blackface. Jolson extended his career by becoming a popular recording star and the host of radio shows.

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