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Post Date: Wed, June 19, 2019

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Post Date: Sat, June 22, 2019

This film, set in 1930s Kansas City, features Blondie (Jennifer Jason Leigh), the wife of a petty thief named Johnny who gets abducted by a major KC mobster, Seldom Seen (Harry Belafonte). In order to save her husband, Blondie abducts the wife of a prominent politician who is connected to the mob as leverage to free him. Conditions complicate as Blondie and the politician's wife, Carolyn Stilton (Miranda Richardson), befriend each other along the way.

Post Date: Wed, June 5, 2019

This print depicts a grid of various industries in Kansas City in 1883 as printed on the lower border of the matting. The print offers exterior and interior in-use accounts of many of the industries. Of those featured are the S. E. Scott & Co. Real Estate Office; the Journal Building with views of the composing room, press room, office, and editorial room; The Deere Mansur & Co. Farm Machinery building; the McCord & Nave Merchantile Co.; the Union Depot; The Geo. Y. Smith & Co.

Post Date: Wed, February 24, 2021

Published by the Lanward Specialty Publishing Co., Chicago, this print highlights several of the more prominent buildings and neighborhoods of Kansas City as it appeared in 1855. The bird's-eye views include a centrally positioned an image of the Missouri River with buildings on one bank and a Native American settlement on the other bank, between the two move the riverboats. The buildings identified in this piece include the Warder Grand Opera House, Kansas City Times Building, National Agricultural Exposition Building, Board of Trade, Independence Avenue M.E.

Post Date: Wed, June 12, 2019

Ariel view of the Kansas City skyline. The sepia toned print of the skyline shows a unique view of developing downtown Kansas City. This metropolitan view contains many iconic structures including the Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City City Hall, Oak Tower, also called the Bell Telephone Building, Kansas City Power and Light Building , and the AT&T building amid the urban downtown landscape. The downtown area experienced a revival in the early 2000s and the success of the development can still be seen today.

Post Date: Sat, June 15, 2019

Promotional poster for Kansas City Area Transportation Authority marketing 'DIMETOWN', a ten cent ride program to various parts of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The enlarged poster is patriotically colored, the lettering is mostly blue, with the exception of DIMETOWN which is blue bordered containing a red and white interior, and a white background.

Post Date: Sat, September 5, 2020

This lectum was designed to empower the speaker before the audience. Rectangular in shape, the top of the piece provides ample space for the speaker to rest their hands on either side of the angled book platform. The platform is upholstered in a red velvet material in order to keep the speaker's materials from sliding downward. The upper section of the lectum narrows downward over a series of beveled edges that create the illusion of elevating the speaker. The body of the lectum remains rectangular with two wooden columns fashioned into the base.

Post Date: Sat, June 15, 2019

This map provides a color-blocked depiction of Kansas City on a grid. The map used for this print was presumably much older since the key at the top identifies horse and cable roads as well as steam roads throughout the city. Steam roads refers to the roads that were created to accommodate the steam powered vehicles developed in the 1800s. The Missouri side, in yellow, features most of the grid as well as the Missouri Pacific, Chicago & Alton, and Kansas City Sunbelt railroads. They trail into the Kansas side, which is pink, and features more of the grid and the Shawnee Reserve.

Post Date: Thu, February 25, 2021

This enlarged reproduction print depicts a map of Kansas City showing the progress of Works of Improvement from surveys conducted in December of 1890 and again in October and November of 1891. The Missouri River Commission, Kansas City Division, created this plate to show the stages of water within a given time frame.

Post Date: Wed, June 12, 2019

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 american dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all american family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

Post Date: Sat, June 15, 2019

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 American dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all-American family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

Post Date: Wed, May 15, 2019

Covering what was "New in Kansas City", this article mentions the installment of the Pickwick-Greyhound bus terminal. At the time, it was the world's largest and its placement in Kansas City was decided by the city's central location in the country. The city had highways extend in every direction, and had experienced steady growth and prosperity. The article markets Kansas City as "unexcelled by any other metropolis" as an industrial center because of its transportation facilities. Next to these statements are sketched illustrations of the bus station from ground and aerial views.

Post Date: Wed, March 24, 2021

Taken from the vantage point, this photograph captures the budding country club plaza district of Kansas City, Missouri. Prominent developer J.C. Nichols designed the plaza with an architectural aesthetic inspired by Seville, Spain, which he visited in the early twenties before opening the plaza in 1923. He built a half-scale replica of Seville’s Giralda tower as a cornerstone of the district, centrally located in the skyline of this photograph.

Post Date: Thu, May 23, 2019

As described on the KCPL website, "Courtney S. Turner was an Atchison businessman and philanthropist. Before he died in 1986, he pledged to use his financial resources to help Atchison and other communities, and the Courtney S. Turner Charitable Trust was established. In the recent past, the trust has benefited Veterans Memorial Park in Atchison, Northeast Kansas Technical College, the Atchison County Historical Society, and the Atchison Santa Fe Depot."

Post Date: Sat, May 4, 2019

Like thousands of other families in the 19th century, the Hixons took advantage of photography as an affordable way to capture images of loved ones. During his own career Hixon contributed to the development of a new, less formal type of studio portrait that emphasized individuality and personality rather than relying on standard props or formal poses. In this photograph, focus is placed on a matriarchal figure surrounded by six children, three girls to the left and three boys to the right. Each figure is poised in a dignified stance, in formal attire and solemn expressions.

Post Date: Wed, May 22, 2019

Col. James L. Abernathy was born in Warren County, Ohio, March 20, 1833. Abernathy was famed for his business acumen, most notably Leavenworth, KS where he moved in 1856. Abernathy helped stimulate the economic growth of Leavenworth, turning it into a veritable Midwest-Boomtown in the nineteenth century. Abernathy and his brother William began in the retail furniture business. Their operation was the rudiment to what later became a furniture manufacture, and one of the largest of Leavenworth’s industries. Abernathy also had a successful military career.

Post Date: Wed, April 14, 2021

The original Kansas City Public Library building was constructed under Greenwood's direction and he was committed to making its services available to the public for the rest of his life. He served on the Kansas City Public School board as a superintendent for nearly four decades. Through his progressive programs and vision, Greenwood became highly regarded in educational spheres. Greenwood is commemorated here in classic portraiture style, frontally posed with a patient expression. He donned a quaint black onyx pennant on his tie for the occasion, suiting his memory as elegant and humble.

Post Date: Thu, April 4, 2019

As a portrait photographer, it was Hixon’s responsibility to develop his subjects’ public image and give them a product they could share with theater producers, newspapers, or friends. Hixon also had an image to maintain and portraits of him reveal his desire to be seen as sophisticated, fashionable man of his time as well as a great artist. Most portraits of Hixon were taken while he was working at Studebaker Studio in Kansas City prior to opening his own studio. They are likely self-portraits, although Studebaker himself may have also photographed Hixon.

Post Date: Thu, April 4, 2019

Like many families in the 19th century, the Hixons took advantage of photography as an affordable way to capture images of loved ones. During his own career, Hixon contributed to the development of a new, less formal type of studio portrait that emphasized individuality and personality rather than relying on standard props or formal poses. In this photograph, focus is placed on a matriarchal figure surrounded by six children, three girls to the left and three boys to the right. Each figure is dressed in formal attire, poised in a dignified stance with solemn expression.

Post Date: Sat, March 2, 2019

The photograph depicts the side silhouette of former President Harry S. Truman walking across the street of the Independence Square. The original photograph was taken in 1960. An accompanying plaque dedicates this work as being "presented to R. Crosby Kemper III, in recognition of outstanding leadership and commitment to the Harry S. Truman Library Institute for National and International Affairs." The dedication is dated September 14th, 2006.

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