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Kansas City and Industries 1883

This print depicts a grid of various industries in Kansas City in 1883 as printed on the lower border of the matting. The print offers exterior and interior in-use accounts of many of the industries. Of those featured are the S. E. Scott & Co. Real Estate Office; the Journal Building with views of the composing room, press room, office, and editorial room; The Deere Mansur & Co. Farm Machinery building; the McCord & Nave Merchantile Co.; the Union Depot; The Geo. Y. Smith & Co.

Kansas City Skyline

Ariel view of the Kansas City skyline. The sepia toned print of the skyline shows a unique view of developing downtown Kansas City. This metropolitan view contains many iconic structures including the Jackson County Courthouse, Kansas City City Hall, Oak Tower, also called the Bell Telephone Building, Kansas City Power and Light Building , and the AT&T building amid the urban downtown landscape. The downtown area experienced a revival in the early 2000s and the success of the development can still be seen today.

KCATA 'DIMETOWN'

Promotional poster for Kansas City Area Transportation Authority marketing 'DIMETOWN', a ten cent ride program to various parts of downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The enlarged poster is patriotically colored, the lettering is mostly blue, with the exception of DIMETOWN which is blue bordered containing a red and white interior, and a white background.

Lectum

This lectum was designed to empower the speaker before the audience. Rectangular in shape, the top of the piece provides ample space for the speaker to rest their hands on either side of the angled book platform. The platform is upholstered in a red velvet material in order to keep the speaker's materials from sliding downward. The upper section of the lectum narrows downward over a series of beveled edges that create the illusion of elevating the speaker. The body of the lectum remains rectangular with two wooden columns fashioned into the base.

Map of Kansas City, MO and Kansas City, KS

This map provides a color-blocked depiction of Kansas City on a grid. The map used for this print was presumably much older since the key at the top identifies horse and cable roads as well as steam roads throughout the city. Steam roads refers to the roads that were created to accommodate the steam powered vehicles developed in the 1800s. The Missouri side, in yellow, features most of the grid as well as the Missouri Pacific, Chicago & Alton, and Kansas City Sunbelt railroads. They trail into the Kansas side, which is pink, and features more of the grid and the Shawnee Reserve.

Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (1)

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 american dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all american family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (2)

Mr. & Mrs. Bridge is a 1990 American dramatic film, based on the novel by Evan S. Connell. The film was directed by James Ivory, produced by Ismail Merchant and a screenplay by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. The film starred real life couple Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. The story follows the all-American family living in the Country Club District of Kansas City, Missouri, during the 1930s and 1940s. The Bridges come to grips with changing social mores and conventions of the time. Mr.

New in Kansas City Advertisement

Covering what was "New in Kansas City", this article mentions the installment of the Pickwick-Greyhound bus terminal. At the time, it was the world's largest and its placement in Kansas City was decided by the city's central location in the country. The city had highways extend in every direction, and had experienced steady growth and prosperity. The article markets Kansas City as "unexcelled by any other metropolis" as an industrial center because of its transportation facilities. Next to these statements are sketched illustrations of the bus station from ground and aerial views.

Portrait of Courtney S. Turner

As described on the KCPL website, "Courtney S. Turner was an Atchison businessman and philanthropist. Before he died in 1986, he pledged to use his financial resources to help Atchison and other communities, and the Courtney S. Turner Charitable Trust was established. In the recent past, the trust has benefited Veterans Memorial Park in Atchison, Northeast Kansas Technical College, the Atchison County Historical Society, and the Atchison Santa Fe Depot."

Portrait of Hixon Family (ii)

Like thousands of other families in the 19th century, the Hixons took advantage of photography as an affordable way to capture images of loved ones. During his own career Hixon contributed to the development of a new, less formal type of studio portrait that emphasized individuality and personality rather than relying on standard props or formal poses. In this photograph, focus is placed on a matriarchal figure surrounded by six children, three girls to the left and three boys to the right. Each figure is poised in a dignified stance, in formal attire and solemn expressions.

Portrait of James L. Abernathy

Col. James L. Abernathy was born in Warren County, Ohio, March 20, 1833. Abernathy was famed for his business acumen, most notably Leavenworth, KS where he moved in 1856. Abernathy helped stimulate the economic growth of Leavenworth, turning it into a veritable Midwest-Boomtown in the nineteenth century. Abernathy and his brother William began in the retail furniture business. Their operation was the rudiment to what later became a furniture manufacture, and one of the largest of Leavenworth’s industries. Abernathy also had a successful military career.

Portrait of Orval Hixon in his Younger Years

As a portrait photographer, it was Hixon’s responsibility to develop his subjects’ public image and give them a product they could share with theater producers, newspapers, or friends. Hixon also had an image to maintain and portraits of him reveal his desire to be seen as sophisticated, fashionable man of his time as well as a great artist. Most portraits of Hixon were taken while he was working at Studebaker Studio in Kansas City prior to opening his own studio. They are likely self-portraits, although Studebaker himself may have also photographed Hixon.

Portrait of the Hixon Family (i)

Like many families in the 19th century, the Hixons took advantage of photography as an affordable way to capture images of loved ones. During his own career, Hixon contributed to the development of a new, less formal type of studio portrait that emphasized individuality and personality rather than relying on standard props or formal poses. In this photograph, focus is placed on a matriarchal figure surrounded by six children, three girls to the left and three boys to the right. Each figure is dressed in formal attire, poised in a dignified stance with solemn expression.

President Truman Walking the Independence Square

The photograph depicts the side silhouette of former President Harry S. Truman walking across the street of the Independence Square. The original photograph was taken in 1960. An accompanying plaque dedicates this work as being "presented to R. Crosby Kemper III, in recognition of outstanding leadership and commitment to the Harry S. Truman Library Institute for National and International Affairs." The dedication is dated September 14th, 2006.

Renaissance Revival Bookcase

This large-scale, Renaissance Revival style bookcase has five cabinet spaces with glass doors framed by ornate wood carvings. The massiveness of the bookcase is balanced by well integrated and articulate ornament. The glass cabinet doors reveal the contents thereby presenting themselves as the true power of the piece. The base protrudes past the cabinet doors of the bookcase. The bookcase is crowned by a trio of iconic figures in literature with a wooden bust of Shakespeare in the center and low reliefs of Lord Byron to the left and Washington Irving to the right.

Russian Map of Kansas City

This enlarged map of Kansas City with a scale of 1:500,000 (1 centimeter to 5 kilometers) including a regional breadth of about 150 miles in any direction. The map is in Russian and focuses on infrastructural features in the region including road and railways, oil, gas, and airfields, gas and power lines, and dams and reservoirs amongst other things. The map's title translates roughly to the General Area of Kansas City and had 10-15-I J-15-A Edition 1983 stamped in the upper right-hand corner.

Scales of Justice

This equal-arm balance scale is comprised of metal (likely brass) and weighs in accordance with the metric system. The most simplistic version of a balancing scale, the equal arm scale balance has been used throughout the earliest periods of history as an elementary lever. The oldest evidence for the presence of weighing scales is dated to circa 2400 to 1800 B.C. in the Indus River valley. This traditional scale consists of a fulcrum, or beam, a pointer, and two scale pans. The two scale plans ( plates) are suspended at equal distance from the fulcrum.

Scholar with Illuminated Manuscripts

This print focuses on the manuscripts of the Liber Floridus by Lambert of Saint-Omer. The depiction alludes to the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the State University of Ghent and the consequent edits of the manuscripts, a presently famous canon, executed by a number of dedicated scholars such as the one pictured. The Liber Floridus is a compilation of a large and richly illustrated encyclopedia dedicated to Lambert's 12th-century conception of the fields of human knowledge.

Scholar's Chair

This is a 19th century antique Chinese horseshoe-style chair made likely from elmwood. The chair was fabricated using pegs and specially carved joinery that reinforces the structure of the chair. The base has A-shaped legs on each side that are conjoined with a footrest. The seat is rectangular with a depression that suggests there was once an accompanying cushion. Two oblong dowels support the yoked armrest and the backrest consists of a single narrow panel with a circular design in relief near the top.

Scholar's Chair

This is a 19th century antique Chinese horseshoe-style chair made likely from elmwood. The chair was fabricated using pegs and specially carved joinery that reinforces the structure of the chair. The base has A-shaped legs on each side that are conjoined with a footrest. The seat is rectangular with a depression that suggests there was once an accompanying cushion. Two oblong dowels support the yoked armrest and the backrest consists of a single narrow panel with a circular design in relief near the top. Three Chinese characters have been stained into the back of the backrest.

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