Reproduction of Bingham's Order No. 11

Inventory
Collection Number: 
17169
Building: 
Current Location: 
Kirk Hall-behind librarian's station
Floor: 
1st
Object Description
Artist: 
Object Type: 
Details: 
This is an oil painting reproduction of the original 1868 painting "Order No. 11" by George Caleb Bingham.
Framed: 
Yes
Length: 
inches
Width: 
inches
Height: 
inches
Description: 

This painting, originally by George Caleb Bingham, depicts a scene of turmoil taking place during the Civil War. Tensions regarding abolition were high between Kansasans and Missourians in the Western Missouri counties. Union General Thomas Ewing Jr. proposed General Order No. 11 to placate the unrest, the order sought to end the fighting by vacating the affected counties completely. Bingham, although pro-Union, was appalled by the prospect and threatened General Ewing with the words "If you execute this order, I shall make you infamous with pen and brush". This he did. In the painting, a caravan of wagons and rural families trail off into the plains, dotted by plumes of smoke billowing into the sky. Their farms had been burned and families displaced, and Bingham situates the culprit, General Ewing, amongst the chaos looking passive as conflict unfolds in the foreground. Two male figures, presumably pro- and anti-abolitionist representatives, stand off against one another while two women plead them to stop. Others kneel over wounded bodies on the ground, apparently shot by the figure in the black coat and red stockings. Bingham was in Kansas City when the order dropped in 1863, very near Jackson, Clay, Bates, and Vernon counties that suffered as a result. He succeeded in casting General Ewing in a negative light as he is the only calm character amongst the death and drama.

Reproduce the Work in Library publications/publicity, including film or videotape: 
Yes
Make slides or videotapes for educational use: 
Yes
Permit the general public to photograph the work : 
Yes