Jessica Kindcaid's "Heaven and Earth," created in 2006, was inspired by a dream the artist had when she was in her early teens.
Tucked amid the other amenities of the Kansas City Public Library’s downtown Central Library — the shelves of popular new books in stately Kirk Hall, the inviting environs of the children’s library and the array of resources available in the business and career center — are a couple of gleaming art galleries.
As a digital inclusion leader, the Kansas City Public Library provides many ways to engage in digital learning, including a Digital Media Lab for teens, over 300 public access computers available over a ten branch system, recurring computer classes and one-on-one tutoring through our new volunteer Tech Coach program as well as Career Online High School and a Hotspots program in partnership with the local school district.  When we discovered learning circles through Peer 2 Peer University, the doors opened to yet another exciting avenue for digital learning!

Library staff members share their best reading experiences of the past year.

Charles W. Gusewelle. Image courtesy of The Kansas City Star.

The Kansas City community lost an iconic writer this past week. Charles W. Gusewelle died Tuesday, November 15th at age 83. He wrote for The Kansas City Star for six decades. A few years ago, Gusewelle took part in the Library’s Dial-A-Story program. He recorded a child’s version of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. We are positing this encore reading of in celebration of Charles Gusewelle’s life.

There are three poets who really break the mold, and set the stage for the modern poetry of the 20th century – these are Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman in America, and Gerard Manley Hopkins in Britain.

The Kansas City Public Library has been making a lot of changes recently that are improving the experience for you, our patrons.

First, we updated our website. Next, we began implementing a new tagging system for library materials. And now we are changing our online catalog system. 

The catalog allows you to search our materials, place holds on items, and interact with your account. The system will allow you to interact with our library staff more easily, create themed lists, review books, and share your recommendations within the library community.
Image courtesy KCPT
Centropolis, a new program from KCPT-TV, is an ongoing conversation about ideas, books, characters, and the absorbing issues of our times. The title comes from William Gilpin, a 19th-century mapmaker and early booster of Kansas City, who believed that civilization’s capital would be an area of greater Kansas City he called “Centropolis.”
Kansas City Public Library has been selected by Peer to Peer University to participate in the next phase of its global expansion. 
From the outside, Herman Lang’s scrapbook looks like any other nondescript, old book.  He created it a little over a century ago as a record of one his hobbies.  However, this is no ordinary scrapbook.  Inside, it contains a story of adventure, suspected espionage, and balloons. 

The Kansas City Public Library will begin temporarily closing its branches in early November 2016 to upgrade its checkout system. The staggered closures will allow staffers to install new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags on books and other materials available to patrons. The process will last into early 2017.

Basho is famous as a composer of haiku. Some even suggest he invented the form, though he did not. One of his most famous works is Oku No Hosomichi (trans. as The Narrow Road to the Interior). This work is considered one of the masterpieces of classical Japanese literature. In form, the work is an haibun, a mixture of prose and haiku. It is an impressionistic journal of a journey Basho made, mostly on foot, in the Spring of 1689. Over the course of 156 days, he traversed about 1500 miles. At the conclusion of his journey from Edo (Tokyo) to the north, and back again, he spent five years refining and completing the work for publication. There are people who go to Japan to retrace Basho’s steps. Given the great changes from Japan of 1689 to Japan in the 21st century, this is impossible in any real sense. In any event, we are not Basho and cannot replicate what happened to him over 400 years ago. But we can appreciate his own depiction of that experience. It is unclear whether Basho attained enlightenment, but, in his haiku, and his other verse, he does aim at the annihilation of subject and object that is key to enlightenment. Haiku is all about the distilling of experience to its essence and somehow summoning the moment that led to an “aha!” moment.

The library contains this work, together with some of Basho’s other haibu and selected haiku, in The Essential Basho, trans. By Sam Hamill.

My daughter's personal copy of Moo, Baa, La La La! by Sandra Boynton.

Do you have your child's favorite book memorized? Kids love to hear the same story over, and over, and OVER again. And again. And again. (Do you see the pattern here?)

In our household, when my daughter was a toddler her beloved book was Moo, Baa, La La La! by Sandra Boynton You can tell from the photo that it was much-loved, and it was not a library copy. I can't swear that I recited it in my sleep, but I probably could have. I know that I performed it, verbatim, for pretty much whoever was willing to listen to me.

There is a reason why kids adore repetition. It builds their brains. Neural connections get stronger by being exposed to the same information time after time after time. A 2015 study at the University of Maryland showed better vocabulary scores for two-year-old kids who had specific words repeated to them when they were seven-month-olds than the outcomes for their peers who didn't experience the repeated phrases as babies.

What is an archivist? What do archivists do? And what exactly are the Missouri Valley Special Collections? If you have ever pondered these questions, now is your chance to #AskAnArchivist! 
New website kclibrary.org
After much hard work and planning, we are proud to unveil the Kansas City Public Library’s new and improved website.

Strike by Delilah S. Dawson

publication date: 2016
pages: 470
ISBN: 978-1-4814-2342-7

Strike was the action-packed sequel to Delilah S. Dawson's 2015 book Hit. Strike began with the main character, Patsy, on the run from her past, her employer, and the pseudo-government. She was also on the run from herself: experiencing guilt and PTSD after killing people to keep herself alive.

Although Patsy struggled with her ethics, she was definitely one of the good guys in this quasi-dystopian very near future. Her and her boyfriend, Wyatt, were caught between Valor Bank – an omnipresent, violent entity that used people's debts and credit cards against them – and Citizens for Freedom – the citizens militia that was using unscrupulous methods to stop Valor Bank.

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