Twenty-five Kansas City households with school-age children will get free wireless Internet access at home as part of a pilot program allowing them to "check out" the service from the Library.

National Digital Inclusion Alliance

Computers and the Internet, including high speed connectivity, are essential in today’s digital society. Those on the wrong side of this digital divide are being left further and further behind.

Join us for our Summer Reading Kick-Off at the Central Library this Saturday! Pickup will be available at many KC Public Library locations with a completed permission slip. Talk to your local teen librarian or call (816) 876-6637 for more info!

Mental Health Month 2015

Not everyone talks about it. We don’t understand mental illness. There is a stigma that makes people look down on those who suffer from it. According to Mental Health America, May is Mental Health Month.

We can take steps to increase our own awareness. There are books that fly in the face of ignorance. They courageously confront the challenges that teens face, including those connected to mental illness. Some books are fact-based. Others are stories of characters who strive to succeed despite being racked by their own internal struggles.

It is rare to find help for such distress. According to Pat Wingert in Newsweek's cover story for one of its 2002 editions,"Young and Depressed": “Most of the nearly 3 million adolescents struggling with depression never get the help they need because of prejudice about mental illness, inadequate mental-health resources and widespread ignorance about how emotional problems can wreck young lives.” So, having the library as a safe place to learn about what they or their friends are facing, to not feel alone, is monumental.

book cover

Hold Tight, Don’t Let Go by Laura Rose Wagner
publication date: 2015
pages: 258
ISBN: 978-1-4197-1204-3

In Hold Tight, Don’t Let Go, Wagner created a coming-of-age story set in the aftermath of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

The prologue, which was probably the most powerfully-written passage in the book, introduced us to Magdalie Jean-Baptiste, and her sister Nadine, just as their lives were torn apart by the earthquake:

Soldiers’ Pay by William Faulkner

With this first novel, see what William Faulkner was like before he became the guardian of Yoknapatawpha County and perhaps the greatest of all American novelists.

Do you want to make a difference in Kansas City?

This summer, the Kansas City Public Library is looking for ten teenagers to form our first ever Teen Leadership Council! These PAID positions will help the library organize and staff some of the biggest teen programs happening in Kansas City this summer, including:

  • The Summer Reading Kick-off Celebration, May 23rd
  • The Harry Potter House Cup Award Ceremony, May 30th
  • The Largest Super Smash Bros Tournament in the World, June 6th
All the Light We Cannot See

The Pulitzer Prize winners for 2015 were announced this week, so it's time to catch up on some Prize-winning reading available here at the Library!

Today, many Kansas Citians know the significance of the old stockyards but could they describe its day-to-day operations? What exactly transpired at the stockyards besides a lot of manure?

The Cure for Dreaming

The Cure for Dreaming by Cat Winters

publication date: 2014
pages: 342
ISBN: 978-1-4197-1216-6

Which author would win in a (literary) fight? That’s the question you get to help answer during BAREKNUCKLE BOOKS, our Author Cage Match - “Paperweight” Division.

Silver Moon: Lullabies and Cradle Songs by Jack Perlutsky and illustrated by Jui Ishida

Poetry does not need to be lofty. It does not need to be revolutionary. It does not need to rhyme or follow a particular form. It can do all of these things, but it doesn’t have to. When we celebrate National Poetry Month every April, sometimes we forget that it is for all ages. That’s right; even tiny babies can enjoy poems.

The poems in The Silver Moon: Lullabies and Cradle Songs by Jack Perlutsky and illustrated by Jui Ishida are song lyrics. There is sheet music in the back of the book for four songs and you can download the musical notation for the rest at Jack Prelutsky's website.

Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice

What do you believe in? What do you stand for? Sometimes, unfairness in the world can make you feel like you are going to explode. At the same time, you can feel helpless. Absolutely powerless. But you aren’t. Your words can awaken. They can embolden. They can ignite.

According to the National Association of Social Workers‘ website: “Social justice is the view that everyone deserves equal economic, political and social rights and opportunities.” We have a book called Indivisible: Poems for Social Justice edited by Gail Bush and Randy Myer with 54 poems by 49 different people. These poets range from Abraham Lincoln to Maya Angelou to Dorothy Parker to Tupac Shakur. The poems touch on such different topics as physical handicaps, immigration, and race-- among others.

Some grievances eat at you. Write down what you think. Then, cut away everything that isn’t necessary. Give us the raw essence; we will get what you mean. You will make us care.

The Kansas City Public Library has received a $100,000 grant to help launch a new, two-year program aimed at improving financial literacy.

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