The Grapes of Wrath (1940)

Sunday, March 9, 2014 6:30 pm

John Ford’s The Grapes of Wrath spends two hours rubbing our noses in poverty and economic exploitation, yet somehow sends us off with hope-filled hearts. Cinematographer Gregg Toland (his next job would be Citizen Kane for Orson Welles) shot the film like a WPA documentary. His black-and-white images are utterly realistic yet achingly beautiful. And the performances from Jane Darwell (who won an Oscar) and Henry Fonda – who in Tom Joad found the greatest character of his storied career – are quietly spectacular.

Movies That Matter – The Sequel continues with screenings of great films with opening and closing remarks by former Kansas City Star film critic Robert W. Butler (now a member of the Library’s Public Affairs staff).

Sundays at 1:30 p.m.

Sept. 29, 2013  The Grand Illusion (France; 1937)

Oct. 27, 2013    The Bride of Frankenstein (USA; 1935)

Nov. 17, 2013    Breathless (France; 1960)

Dec. 1, 2013      Pinocchio (USA; 1940)

Jan. 19, 2014     Sunrise (USA; 1928)

Feb. 16, 2014    An American in Paris (USA; 1951)

Mar. 9, 2014      The Grapes of Wrath (USA; 1940)

Apr. 27, 2014    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (USA; 1948)

May 18, 2014    The Lady Eve (USA; 1941)

Jun. 1, 2014      The Adventures of Robin Hood (USA; 1938)