Civil War Events @ the Library

Upcoming Civil War Events

Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.
Fred Kaplan
Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Plaza Branch
Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.

Past Civil War Events

Closing the Civil War Sesquicentennial series, historians Terry L. Beckenbaugh and Ethan S. Rafuse of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth assess how the North prevailed and why the Civil War remains so compelling today.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
Central Library

After four of the bloodiest years of warfare in its history, peace finally had come to the United States in May 1865. For two glorious days, Washington, D.C., residents watched as the mighty Union armies that had compelled the surrender of the Confederacy’s main forces marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in triumph. “The rebels,” Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed a few weeks earlier, “are our countrymen again.”

Parkville, Missouri, author Tom Rafiner discusses the long, dark, post-Civil War shadow cast by the 1863 edict known as “Order No. 11,” which mandated the evacuation of non-rural residents in three western Missouri counties. Healing in its aftermath took decades.
Sunday, May 17, 2015
Central Library

By the time of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the land and people of western Missouri had suffered as much as any during the Civil War. The 1863 edict known as “Order No. 11”—forcing the evacuation of all non-rural residents of three western counties including Jackson—and the Federal army that carried it out had depopulated those counties, devastated homes and farms, and left deep scars.

Terry Beckenbaugh of the U.S Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the tumultuous final months of the Civil War – marked indelibly by Lincoln’s assassination – and examines the start of Reconstruction in the South.
Tuesday, March 10, 2015
Central Library

With the end of the Civil War in sight as he delivered his second inaugural address in March 1865, Abraham Lincoln eloquently implored his divided countrymen “to bind up the nation’s wounds” and “do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace.”

But the chaos of war was not yet ended. The South was reeling from Sherman’s destructive March to the Sea. Entire cities, including the Confederate capital of Richmond, were being overrun. Forty-one days after being sworn in for a second term, Lincoln was felled by an assassin’s bullet.

Nearing the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Fisher, in which Marines fought, Bud Meador of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth discusses the Marine Corps’ role throughout the Civil War.
Thursday, January 15, 2015
Central Library

The story of the U.S. Marine Corps is one rich in history – of serving the nation from the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli, let alone the ability to survive in the political theater in Washington, D.C.

Ethan S. Rafuse leads a panel of colleagues with the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in examining the momentous year of 1864, when the balance of the Civil War may have tipped to the North.
Wednesday, December 10, 2014
Central Library

The Civil War may have reached a turning point in 1864, when Ulysses S. Grant became general-in-chief of the Union armies, Confederate defeats continued to mount, and Northern voters in November sustained the presidency of Abraham Lincoln.

Author Justin Martin discusses his book about the wild, decadent, and incredibly influential band of artists – including poet Walt Whitman – who hung out at Pfaff’s saloon in New York City in the 1850s and were considered the country’s original Bohemians.
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Central Library

In the shadow of the Civil War, a circle of radicals in a rowdy New York tavern altered American society and helped set Walt Whitman on the path to poetic immortality.

Local historian Daniel Smith reviews the circumstances that caused 30,000 troops to clash for two days in October 1864 along the Blue River and Brush Creek in what is now Kansas City.
Saturday, October 11, 2014
Westport Branch

The Westport Historical Society and the Westport Branch Library present Daniel Smith: Climax on the Border, Battle of Westport 1864

Second Saturday Speaker Series, October 11th, 2014 @ 2:00pm
Westport Branch Library, 118 Westport Road
Speaker's Reception follows at the Harris Kearney House, 40th & Baltimore

Title of Talk: Climax on the Border - Battle of Westport, October 21-23, 1864

Aaron Barnhart and Diane Eickhoff offer an educational and  entertaining look at the events leading up to Price's Raid with an emphasis on the key roles of Generals Sterling Price, Thomas Ewing, and Jo Shelby.
Saturday, September 13, 2014
Westport Branch

The Westport Historical Society and the Westport Branch Library present Aaron Barnhart & Diane Eickhoff: Price's Raid, Then and Now

Second Saturday Speaker Series, September 13th, 2014 @ 2:00pm
Westport Branch Library, 118 Westport Road
Speaker's reception follows at the Harris Kearney House, 40th & Baltimore

Title of Talk: "Price's Raid, Then and Now"

On the 150th anniversary of the railway-focused Battle of Atlanta, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s Christopher R. Gabel examines the importance of rail transportation to both Union and Confederate commanders.
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Central Library

Railroads were essential to moving men and military supplies during the Civil War. The Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864, was an attempt by federal troops under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman to seize Atlanta’s rail center and cripple the Confederate war effort.

On the 150th anniversary of that battle, the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College’s Christopher R. Gabel examines the importance of rail transportation to both Union and Confederate commanders.

Daniel Smith takes a ground-level look at the “Gettysburg of the West,” a bloody Civil War battle that took place in October 1864 in what today are peaceful Kansas City neighborhoods.
Sunday, June 22, 2014
Central Library

On October 21-23, 1864, a Confederate army led by General Sterling Price clashed with its Union counterpart commanded by General Samuel Curtis. The immediate results of this large-scale battle, called by some the “Gettysburg of the West,” were a decisive Union victory and Price’s ignoble retreat from Missouri for the remainder of the Civil War.

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