Civil War Events @ the Library

Past Civil War Events

Shawn Faulkner of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College explains the motivation of Civil War soldiers to fight and endure the hardships of war.
Wednesday, November 30, 2011
Central Library

Shawn Faulkner of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the conditions faced by the average Civil War soldier – on and off the battlefield – in a presentation titled Jonny Reb and Billy Yank.

Faulkner explains the many factors that shaped the daily lives of the soldiers, including the quality and availability of food, clothing, shelter and medical care. Faulkner also answers the question: What motivated soldiers on both sides to fight and to endure the hardships of war?

Saturday, November 12, 2011
Plaza Branch

The Border Reconstructed and Remembered, moderated by Gary Kremer, The State Historical Society of Missouri, and featuring talks by:

Aaron Astor, Maryville College; The Lexington Weekly Caucasian: White Supremacist Discourse in Post-Civil War Western Missouri

John McKerley, The State Historical Society of Missouri; Across the Bloody Chasm: Race, Liberalism, and the Reconstruction of Missouri Politics

Friday, November 11, 2011
Plaza Branch

Sectional Crisis and Civil War on the Western Border, 1860-1865, moderated by William Piston, Missouri State University, and featuring talks by:

Randy Mullis, Command and General Staff College; The Illusion of Security and the Fragility of Peace: Kansas and Missouri on the Eve of the Civil War

Jonathan Earle, University of Kansas; “If I Went West, I Think I Would Go To Kansas”: Abraham Lincoln, the Sunflower State, and the Election of 1860

Join 17 leading scholars of the  Civil War-era conflict in Missouri and Kansas for a series of talks  and presentations on this most uncivil of wars.
Thursday, November 10, 2011

The Border Wars Conference, featuring sessions at both the Central Library and the Plaza Branch, offers an exploration of this most uncivil of wars while providing insight into the ways in which societies can be fragmented by ideology and ultimately rebuilt upon different lines.

Preeminent American Civil War scholar Michael Fellman examines the robbery, arson, torture, murder, and raids that characterized this  most uncivil of wars in the Missouri-Kansas borderlands during the 1850s-60s.
Thursday, November 10, 2011
Central Library

Michael Fellman, a preeminent scholar of the American Civil War and an expert on the guerilla warfare that characterized the conflict in the Missouri-Kansas borderlands, considers how perfectly ordinary Americans could revise their moral and religious beliefs to justify such extraordinary violence with relative ease. Selectively picking texts from Holy Scripture, they assembled a war God perfectly suited to their actions out of Christian belief.

Saturday, November 5, 2011
Westport Branch

On Saturday, November 5, 2011, at 2 pm, Gary Jenkins will be showing a short version of his video "Negroes to Hire" which explores the history of slavery in Missouri. It takes its name from an advertisement in the Library Tribune where Clay County slave masters let it be known that they had slaves who could be hired by others.

Historian Terry Beckenbaugh of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College discusses the first year of the Civil War with an emphasis on battles and events that took place in Missouri.
Thursday, October 27, 2011
Central Library

Historian Terry Beckenbaugh of the Military History Department at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses The First Year of the Civil War in Missouri.

Award-winning historian  William C. Harris argues that Confederate campaigns and guerrilla activities kept the region in constant turmoil, and that those states preoccupied Lincoln throughout the war.
Thursday, October 6, 2011
Central Library

Faced with a divided nation, Abraham Lincoln deemed the loyalty of the border slave states crucial to the preservation of the Union. But while most scholars contend that these states were secure by the end of 1861, award-winning historian William C. Harris argues in Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union, that Confederate campaigns and guerrilla activities kept the region in constant turmoil, and that those states preoccupied Lincoln throughout the war.

Author and former Kansas City resident Justin Martin discusses his new biography of renowned landscape architect, abolitionist, and early environmentalist Frederick Law Olmsted.
Wednesday, September 7, 2011
Central Library

Author and former Kansas City resident Justin Martin discusses his latest book, Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted, a biography of the renowned landscape architect, early environmentalist, and abolitionist.

Five-string banjo virtuoso  Frank B. Converse, portrayed by Carl Anderton, discusses his life and performs Civil War-era songs.
Sunday, August 21, 2011
Plaza Branch

Frank B. Converse is considered by many to be the first great virtuoso of “America’s instrument” the five-string banjo.

Join Converse, portrayed by veteran Chautauqua performer Carl Anderton, for a discussion of his life and a demonstration of some Civil War-era banjo music. Converse worked tirelessly to dismiss the idea that the banjo was a simple instrument.

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