Civil War Events @ the Library

Upcoming Civil War Events

Past Civil War Events

To mark the 150th anniversary of the first major clash of the Civil War, military historian Ethan Rafuse of the Command and General Staff College describes the First Battle of Bull Run and the leaders who shaped its outcome.
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
Central Library

Although relatively small compared to the great clashes to come, the Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) was a seminal event in American history. When the smoke cleared on July 21, 1861, nearly 900 men were dead, the Union army was in retreat, and the South had won the first major battle of the Civil War.

Dr. Ethan Rafuse, professor of military history at the Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, describes the battle and those who shaped its outcome.

The event is co-sponsored by the Command and General Staff College Foundation.

The 2011 Kansas City Architecture Series examines the fascinating history and architecture of local residences built in the decades just before the Civil War.
Sunday, July 10, 2011
Plaza Branch

The Plaza Branch continues its annual Kansas City Architecture series, focusing this year on antebellum homes in recognition of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War.

In this installment, Tom Cooke examines the history of the Bent-Ward House, a property located at 1032 W. 55th Street whose farm pastures (now Loose Park) served as part of the battleground during the Battle of Westport. Though it takes its name from Colonel William W. Bent and successive owner Seth E. Ward, the property was also once owned by Mormon Bishop Edward Partridge as well as Alexander Doniphan.

The 2011 Kansas City Architecture Series examines the fascinating history and architecture of local residences built in the decades just before the Civil War.
Sunday, June 26, 2011
Plaza Branch

The Plaza Branch continues its annual Kansas City Architecture series, focusing this year on antebellum homes in recognition of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War.

Tom Taylor reviews the history of the Alexander Majors House and the John B. Wornall House.

DePaul University political scientist Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held  ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.
Thursday, June 23, 2011
Plaza Branch

Author Larry Bennett tackles some of our commonly held ideas about the “Windy City” with the goal of better understanding modern-day Chicago.

Bennett, a professor of political science at DePaul University, calls contemporary Chicago “the third city” to distinguish it from its two predecessors: “the first city,” a sprawling industrial center whose historical arc ran from the Civil War to the Great Depression; and “the second city,” the Rustbelt exemplar of the period from around 1950 to 1990.

The 2011 Kansas City Architecture Series examines the fascinating history and architecture of local residences built in the decades just before the Civil War.
Sunday, June 19, 2011
Plaza Branch

The Plaza Branch hosts its annual Kansas City Architecture series, focusing this year on antebellum homes in recognition of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War.

Eric Bushner, vice-president of community and government relations for James B. Nutter & Company, discusses the history of the Nathan Scarritt Home — the oldest frame house still standing in the Westport area — located at 4038 Central St.

Professor David Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.
Sunday, June 5, 2011
Plaza Branch

David Meyers, a professor of medicine- cardiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center, presents a discussion on Medicine in the Civil War.

Meyers is a member of the Society of Civil War Surgeons. For more than 25 years, he has lectured on Civil War medicine. In his presentation, Meyers examines the surgical techniques used during the war as well as the predominance of disease as a cause of death.

Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.
Tuesday, April 26, 2011
Central Library

Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.

Author Gregory Wolk discusses his new book, A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War, the first comprehensive sesquicentennial driver’s guide to Civil War battlefield sites in Missouri.
Wednesday, April 20, 2011
Plaza Branch

Author Gregory Wolk discusses his new book, A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War, the first comprehensive sesquicentennial driver’s guide to Civil War battlefield sites in Missouri.

One of Missouri’s most acclaimed musical groups, Shortleaf Band with Michael Fraser presents a concert featuring original and traditional music from the Civil War.
Sunday, April 10, 2011
Plaza Branch

Shortleaf Band with Michael Fraser presents a concert featuring original and traditional music from the Civil War. One of Missouri’s most acclaimed musical groups, the band has conducted extensive research into Civil War-era music and composition techniques, and has performed at various Civil War re-enactments as well as at the John Wornall House Museum. Shortleaf has its roots in the Ozarks, but is now based in Kansas City. The band’s core includes fiddle, flute, and guitar.

On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Military historian Ethan Rafuse discusses the battle and the effect it had on a nation that had feared a civil war for months before the first shots were fired.
Tuesday, April 5, 2011
Central Library

On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, ending an excruciating period of uncertainty and marking the start of the most destructive war ever waged on American soil—the Civil War.

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