Civil War Events @ the Library

Past Civil War Events

Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.
Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Historian David Goldfield discusses his vivid narrative history of the Civil War, America Aflame, which offers the first major new interpretation of the era in 20 years.

Author Gregory Wolk discusses his new book, A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War, the first comprehensive sesquicentennial driver’s guide to Civil War battlefield sites in Missouri.
Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Author Gregory Wolk discusses his new book, A Tour Guide to Missouri’s Civil War, the first comprehensive sesquicentennial driver’s guide to Civil War battlefield sites in Missouri.

One of Missouri’s most acclaimed musical groups, Shortleaf Band with Michael Fraser presents a concert featuring original and traditional music from the Civil War.
Sunday, April 10, 2011

Shortleaf Band with Michael Fraser presents a concert featuring original and traditional music from the Civil War. One of Missouri’s most acclaimed musical groups, the band has conducted extensive research into Civil War-era music and composition techniques, and has performed at various Civil War re-enactments as well as at the John Wornall House Museum. Shortleaf has its roots in the Ozarks, but is now based in Kansas City. The band’s core includes fiddle, flute, and guitar.

On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. Military historian Ethan Rafuse discusses the battle and the effect it had on a nation that had feared a civil war for months before the first shots were fired.
Tuesday, April 5, 2011

On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina, ending an excruciating period of uncertainty and marking the start of the most destructive war ever waged on American soil—the Civil War.

Local historian Joelouis Mattox of the Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center in Kansas City presents the story of the United States Colored Troops in the Civil War.
Sunday, March 27, 2011

Local historian Joelouis Mattox of the Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center in Kansas City presents the story of the United States Colored Troops.

Mattox will discuss the contributions of African Americans who served in the Civil War, specifically the so-called “Blacks in Blue” from Missouri and Kansas who fought for the Union at the Battle of Island Mound in Bates County, Missouri, on October 29, 1862, and the Battle of Westport on October 21-23, 1864.

U.S. Appellate Judge Deanell Reece Tacha discusses the Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area, a new entity that will illuminate nationally significant stories about the struggle over freedom on the Missouri-Kansas border.
Sunday, November 14, 2010

The Kansas City Public Library welcomes U.S. Appellate Judge Deanell Reece Tacha for a discussion of the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area on Sunday, November 14, at 2 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

Author Susan K. Salzer discusses her debut novel, a fictional Civil War romance between an injured Jesse James and the young nurse tending his wounds.
Sunday, June 20, 2010

Author Susan K. Salzer discusses her debut novel, a fictional story set in Missouri during the Civil War that is based on actual events.

Hattie Rood is a teenage girl whose weary family is given an extra burden when Confederate rebels leave a wounded 17-year-old Jesse James in her care.

While her aging father tends to their struggling tobacco crop, Hattie nurses the boy back to health—learning about herself and the nature of war along the way.

Howard Frank Mosher discusses his new Civil War odyssey about a Vermont teenager's journey south to find his missing-in-action brother.
Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Howard Frank Mosher discusses his new book Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel on Tuesday, March 30, at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

The story begins with 17-year-old Morgan Kinneson helping a black slave, Jesse, escape to Canada during the American Civil War. When Morgan is drawn away by the chance to kill a moose that would feed his family for months, he returns to find that Jesse has been murdered.

Author Marc Wortman discusses his new book about the Union victory he says “pierced the  heart” of the Confederacy  and all but ended the Civil War.
Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Author Marc Wortman discusses his new book The Bonfire: The Siege and Burning of Atlanta on Wednesday, February 17, at 6:30 p.m. at the Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

The Bonfire recounts the battle for Atlanta, known then as “the Gate City of the South,” during the summer of 1864 that resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers and ultimately lead to the burning of the city in September 1864.

Author and historian Ron Smith discusses his new book about the man best known in Kansas City for issuing the controversial General Order No. 11, forcibly removing Confederate sympathizers in rural western Missouri.
Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Historian Ron Smith discusses his new book Thomas Ewing Jr.: Frontier Lawyer and Civil War General.

Smith takes readers back to Bleeding Kansas, with its border ruffians and land speculators, to show how Thomas Ewing Jr. and his family played pivotal roles in the history of Kansas, Missouri, and the nation.

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