Screening Desire

David Thomson
In a discussion of his latest book, Sleeping With Strangers: How the Movies Shaped Desire, noted film critic and historian David Thomson examines how movies shape our ideas about love and sex. That can be problematic. It also has its upside.
Monday, October 14, 2019
Program: 
6:30 pm

We take our seats in a darkened movie theater, turn ourselves over for a couple of hours to a romantic storyline and the romantic leads, and walk away more affected than we probably know.

In a discussion of his latest book, Sleeping With Strangers: How the Movies Shaped Desire, noted film critic and historian David Thomson examines how movies shape our ideas about love and sex. We fall for the stars on the screen and sometimes use them as guides in negotiating romance in real life, a problematic occurrence that can foster notions of male supremacy and female servitude—things we’re slowly coming to terms with in the #MeToo moment. But it also has made us more sexually honest. And it undoubtedly has broadened minds on LGBT matters.
 

In advance of the event, the Library screens six films illustrating how love and sex have traditionally been portrayed on the big screen, often in disconnect with today’s #MeToo views.

 

Each screening is at 6:30 p.m. at the Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

 

Please note that some selections feature mature subject matter.

 

Tuesday, October 1: Bonnie & Clyde (1967; R)

Wednesday, October 2: Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921; NR)

Friday, October 4: His Girl Friday (1940; NR)

Monday, October 7: Adam’s Rib (1949; NR)

Wednesday, October 9: American Gigolo (1980; R)