Library Blog

Library Life

Social Networkers Plug Into Local History at the Westport Branch

Tim Westcott lectures on General Order No. 11

On a hot Saturday last month, 50 people gathered at the Westport Branch to learn about another August day 147 years ago, when soldiers ordered 20,000 Missouri civilians from their homes. It was a period in local history as regrettable as it is compelling. In the Union Army's reprisal for guerrilla raids against places like Lawrence, Kansas, lives were lost and houses burned.

Library Life

Back to School, Westside-style

Uncle Sam juggles with schoolkids at the Ruiz Branch. (Photos by Elise Del Vecchio)

It’s the first week of the 2010 school year in Kansas City, Missouri, a time of energy and excitement. And for many parents, it’s a time for cutting back – those no. 2 pencils and spiral notebooks add up. Thanks to the KC Public Library’s Ruiz Branch, nearly 200 Westside families got a break from the school-supply squeeze.

Book Reviews

The Best New Horror Fiction

The Feed by Mira Grant

This year I have the great honor of being a member of the American Library Association’s national committee to pick the best genre books of the year for the award called The Reading List. I am spending my year reading brand-new books in seven different genres and am, along with my committee members, trying to find the year’s best-of-the-best in Romance, Fantasy, Science Fiction, Women's Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery and Horror.  

Book Reviews

Book Review: Lawrence Survivors of Quantrill's Raid

The survivors of the Lawrence Massacre are featured in a new book.

Of William Quantrill, the Reverend H.D. Fisher wrote: “In him were represented courage and cowardice; successful leadership, intrigue, cunning, desperation, revenge and hate, all to a marked degree.” Fisher would have known, too – Quantrill nearly killed him.

Featured Authors

A Crime Anthology for the Modern Mystery Lover

Rosemary Herbert discusses her New Omnibus of Crime August 26 at the Plaza Branch.

From Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot to CSI’s Catherine Willows, crime writing has changed a lot in the past 75 years. A New Omnibus of Crime shows how crime fiction has developed from a genteel genre populated by old ladies solving crimes over tea to a scientific discipline full of cold-blooded killers.