Picnic

All Library locations will be closed on Monday, September 1, in observance of Labor Day.

The Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre presents William Inge’s Picnic, the second performance in the American Classics Script-in-Hand series.
Script-in-Hand series
Sunday, February 7, 2010
2:00pm @ Plaza Branch
Related Events:
Script in Hand 2009-2010

American Classics, the fourth season of the Script-in-Hand series presented by the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, continues with Picnic, by Kansas native William Inge.

In his 1953 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Inge focuses on small-town Kansas in the 1950s as a group of women wrestle with the expectations of society and what is in their own hearts. The play is regarded as a pioneering drama for its frank depiction of sexuality and its subliminally cynical take on the idea that “love conquers all.”   

The series is sponsored by The Friends of the Kansas City Public Library.

Other plays in the series include:

That Championship Season

by Jason Miller
Sunday, March 7, 2010—2 p.m.
Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

Four members of a state championship basketball team from Scranton, Pennsylvania, reunite to spend time with their dying coach in this 1973 Pulitzer Prize-winning play. While none of the men's lives turned out as they'd hoped, they all still look to their coach for guidance. Only now, the men begin to suspect that their coach was a bigot, a bully, and a bit of a fraud.

South Pacific

by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein
Sunday, May 2, 2010—2 p.m.
Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

On a South Pacific island during World War II, love blossoms between a young nurse and a secretive Frenchman who's being courted for a dangerous military mission. Often referred to as one of the greatest musicals in history, South Pacific's original Broadway run garnered a Pulitzer Prize in 1950 and 10 Tony Awards.

For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf

Sunday, June 13, 2010—2 p.m.
Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

ENCORE PERFORMANCE
Monday, June 14, 2010—7 p.m.
L.H. Bluford Branch, 3050 Prospect Ave.

This 1975 "choreopoem" is a unique tale of black women's journey in America and is a compilation of 20 poems set to music while touching on a spectrum of emotions from love to broken hearts and abandonment.