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Kansas City Black History 2020
Each year, the Library partners with the Local Investment Commission (LINC) and the Black Archives of Mid-America to produce a series of Black History Month materials celebrating the legacies and accomplishments of notable African-Americans from the Kansas City area. The individuals featured in the 2020 series all helped break down barriers in our community, elevating and inspiring others then and now. Read on to learn more about their achievements.
 
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The Kansas City Public Library is pleased to announce the addition of 1,109 digitized yearbooks to our digital history site KCHistory.org. Resulting from more than two years of work by Missouri Valley Special Collections staff, the Kansas City Area High School Yearbooks Collection has tremendous research potential.

The holiday spirit is in full swing in Kansas City and, to help celebrate, we’re responding to a reader who asked about the origins of the lights on the Country Club Plaza – one of the most notable Christmas light traditions in the country.

You won’t find Dallas, Missouri, on a current map. It’s no longer incorporated and, even when it was, the small settlement on the banks of Indian Creek near 103rd Street and State Line Road was better known by its most prominent landmark: Watts Mill.

As sure as the morning commute, it’s time for another “What’s Your KCQ?” A KCQ readers asks: “Why does U.S. 71 (Bruce R. Watkins Memorial Drive) have stoplights instead of a straight run downtown?”

Library Next Chapter graphic
One year ago, voters overwhelmingly approved an 8-cent increase in the Library’s property tax-based operating levy – the first adjustment to the rate in 22 years. Thanks to that support and funding, the Library has been doing even more for the people we serve. As we broaden our services and respond to growing community needs, we want to keep you informed about our progress in what we call the Library’s Next Chapter. Learn what's happening at your neighborhood Library location, discover new or expanded services, and see how we’re working to improve patron experiences.
 

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