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Black Lives Matter, Black Stories Matter
Last modified: 
Friday, June 5, 2020
Our city and nation are hurting in the wake of the senseless, horrifying death of George Floyd on May 25, 2020. The Kansas City Public Library stands in full support of the many across our country — including our staff and their families and others in our community — who have marched in protest and in profound, insistent hope for the future.  We decry the longstanding racial inequities and injustice at the root of their unrest. We need more than ever to understand the challenges of a diverse America, allowing us to define and develop effective change when and wherever it is necessary.
 
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Last modified: 
Thursday, April 9, 2009

In this current school year, more than 6,200 Teach for America corps members are teaching in America's neediest communities, reaching approximately 400,000 students. These books discuss the Teach for America experience and model or examine urban education in general.

Teach for America | Urban education

Teach for America

One Day, All Children: The Unlikely Triumph of Teach For America and What I Learned Along the Way
By Wendy Kopp
Not just a personal memoir, this is a blueprint for a new civil rights movement that demands educational access and opportunity for all American children.

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Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Have you ever wished that you could talk to a ghost? (A friendly one, of course.) Reading about history is like talking to ghosts—finding out what people thought and how they lived. You can re-live their adventures or discover how they overcame difficult circumstances such as sexism, racism, and war.

The Kansas City Public Library isn’t haunted (as far as we know), but you can meet the past. Starting in April, Library Director Crosby Kemper III will interview re-enactors portraying famous people from the past, such as poet Langston Hughes, pilot Amelia Earhart, and President Harry S. Truman.

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Friday, April 3, 2009

I imagine this book award slipped by you: the Diagram Prize for Oddest Book Title of the Year. Sponsored by The Bookseller magazine, anyone can nominate a book title for this prize and votes by the public are tallied online. It has nothing to do with content and everything to do with, well, title oddity.

The Bookseller recently announced the 2008 winnerThe 2009-2014 World Outlook for 60-miligram Containers of Fromage Frais – which beat out Baboon Metaphysics, Strip and Knit with Style, and Curbside Consultation of the Colon, among others.

So, in the spirit of the Diagram Prize, here are a few titles published in 2009 that I thought might be worthy of this illustrious award. Which one would you vote for? Or suggest another title in a comment below!

Nuclear Jellyfish book jacket

Forbidden Bread: A Memoir by Erica Johnson-Debeljak

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Thursday, April 2, 2009

The novels in these series mix up the genres with a blend of fantasy and mystery.

Dresden Files series by Jim Butcher
Meet Harry Dresden, a professional wizard and investigator with a consulting practice in modern-day Chicago. Dresden’s profession offers him little money, lots of mockery, the suspicion of his magical colleagues, and plenty of danger.

Last modified: 
Thursday, April 2, 2009

Pick up a book by award-winning author Sandra Cisneros or discover a novel that you might like if you enjoy Cisneros’ work in this recommended book list. Cisneros visits the Library on April 16, 2009, to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the publication of her classic The House on Mango Street

Books by Sandra Cisneros
If you like Sandra Cisneros, try one of these novels…

Books by Sandra Cisneros

The House on Mango Street book jacket

The House on Mango Street
By Sandra Cisneros
In a series of vignettes stunning for their eloquence, this is the story of Esperanza Cordero, a young girl growing up in the Latino section of Chicago with all its hard realities of life. She captures her thoughts and emotions in poems and stories in order to rise above the hopelessness and create a space for herself.

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