Latest at the Library

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November 9, 2009, is the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. These books at the Library explore the history of the Wall and modern Berlin.

Tear Down This Wall: A City, a President, and the Speech That Ended the Cold War
By Romesh Ratnesar
This book explores the events leading up to and after the “Tear Down this Wall” speech that President Ronald Reagan gave in front of 20,000 people in West Berlin. 

The Fall of the Berlin Wall
By William F. Buckley
The fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989 was the turning point in the struggle against Communism in Eastern Europe. William F. Buckley, conservative pundit, explains how and why the Cold War ended as it did – and what lessons we can draw from the experience.

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These books at the Library tell the personal stories of people who have experienced homelessness firsthand.

Related event:
Steve Lopez discusses his book The Soloist, Nov. 4, 2009

The Soloist: A Lost Dream, an Unlikely Friendship, and the Redemptive Power of Music
By Steve Lopez
This moving story of a remarkable bond between a journalist in search of a story and a homeless, classically trained musician, The Soloist was also made into a feature film starring Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey, Jr.

Nomads of a Desert City book jacket

Nomads of a Desert City: Personal Stories from Citizens of the Street
Photographs & interviews by Barbara Seyda
Seyda interviewed and photographed thirteen homeless men and women, young and old, in Tucson, Arizona. This book presents a portrait of life on the street and in homeless shelters in the words of those who live it.

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These memoirs and histories depict life in Hungary – from World War II to living under Communist rule to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

Enemies of the People: My Family's Journey to America
By Kati Marton
Renowned author Kati Marton tells how her journalist parents survived the Nazis in Budapest and were imprisoned by the Soviets. After obtaining secret police files detailing her family's activities in Budapest during Nazi and Communist regimes, Marton discovered terrifying truths: secret love affairs, betrayals inside the family circle, and brutalities alongside acts of stunning courage - and, above all, deep family love. Based on reports and her own interviews, she reveals how her parents - pawns in the Cold War between Washington and Moscow - were betrayed by friends and colleagues, even their babysitter, and eventually imprisoned.

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