Civil War Events @ the Library

Past Civil War Events

Public historians Diane Eickhoff and Aaron Barnhart recall how hundreds of women defied cultural norms of the time to participate in the Civil War, cutting their hair, binding their breasts, donning men’s clothing, and reporting to army recruiters for duty. Others served as scouts or spies.
Aaron Barnhart, Diane Eickhoff
Sunday, September 16, 2018
Public historians Diane Eickhoff and Aaron Barnhart recall how hundreds of women defied cultural norms of the time to participate in the Civil War, cutting their hair, binding their breasts, donning men’s clothing, and reporting to army recruiters for duty. Others served as scouts or spies.
 
In the keynote address for the Quindaro Symposium, held April 19-21 in Kansas City, Kansas, historian Quintard Taylor explores the history of the Quindaro region from 1855-65, and the nexus between border fighting and freedom for the enslaved.
Quintard Taylor
Thursday, April 19, 2018
In the keynote address for the Quindaro Symposium, held April 19-21 in Kansas City, Kansas, historian Quintard Taylor explores the history of the Quindaro region from 1855-65, and the nexus between border fighting and freedom for the enslaved.
 
Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.
Fred Kaplan
Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.
In a discussion of her book, Park University historian Debra Sheffer examines early African-American military service – from colonial times through the era of the 19th-century Buffalo Soldier – and how it paved the way for black soldiers in future conflicts.
Debra Sheffer
Sunday, February 12, 2017
African-Americans have served proudly in every great American war, including the Civil War, where their verve and valor led to the establishment of all-black regiments in 1866. These “Buffalo Soldiers” played a significant role in the military campaigns and settlement of the American West, and paved the way for African-American soldiers in future conflicts.
 
Closing the Civil War Sesquicentennial series, historians Terry L. Beckenbaugh and Ethan S. Rafuse of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth assess how the North prevailed and why the Civil War remains so compelling today.
Tuesday, May 26, 2015

After four of the bloodiest years of warfare in its history, peace finally had come to the United States in May 1865. For two glorious days, Washington, D.C., residents watched as the mighty Union armies that had compelled the surrender of the Confederacy’s main forces marched down Pennsylvania Avenue in triumph. “The rebels,” Ulysses S. Grant proclaimed a few weeks earlier, “are our countrymen again.”

Parkville, Missouri, author Tom Rafiner discusses the long, dark, post-Civil War shadow cast by the 1863 edict known as “Order No. 11,” which mandated the evacuation of non-rural residents in three western Missouri counties. Healing in its aftermath took decades.
Sunday, May 17, 2015

By the time of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, the land and people of western Missouri had suffered as much as any during the Civil War. The 1863 edict known as “Order No. 11”—forcing the evacuation of all non-rural residents of three western counties including Jackson—and the Federal army that carried it out had depopulated those counties, devastated homes and farms, and left deep scars.

On the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s death, historian Richard Brookhiser discusses his new book about our 16th president and the guidance and inspiration he took from the lives and works of George Washington, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson.
Wednesday, April 15, 2015

For Abraham Lincoln, the road to the future always began in the past – with the Founding Fathers, who inspired him to take up public life, showed him how to win arguments, and laid out his nation’s principles.

On the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s death, historian Richard Brookhiser delivers an illuminating new look at our 16th and arguably greatest president.

Ethan S. Rafuse of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the South’s stunning downturn in the final two years of the Civil War and the events preceding Robert E. Lee’s surrender in April 1865.
Wednesday, April 1, 2015

On the morning of May 3, 1863, on the cusp of one of the most remarkable tactical battlefield victories in American military history, Gen. Robert E. Lee rode to a crossroads clearing in Virginia known as Chancellorsville amid the cheers of his high-spirited Confederate troops.

Terry Beckenbaugh of the U.S Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth discusses the tumultuous final months of the Civil War – marked indelibly by Lincoln’s assassination – and examines the start of Reconstruction in the South.
Tuesday, March 10, 2015

With the end of the Civil War in sight as he delivered his second inaugural address in March 1865, Abraham Lincoln eloquently implored his divided countrymen “to bind up the nation’s wounds” and “do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace.”

But the chaos of war was not yet ended. The South was reeling from Sherman’s destructive March to the Sea. Entire cities, including the Confederate capital of Richmond, were being overrun. Forty-one days after being sworn in for a second term, Lincoln was felled by an assassin’s bullet.

Nearing the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Fisher, in which Marines fought, Bud Meador of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in Leavenworth discusses the Marine Corps’ role throughout the Civil War.
Thursday, January 15, 2015

The story of the U.S. Marine Corps is one rich in history – of serving the nation from the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli, let alone the ability to survive in the political theater in Washington, D.C.

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