Civil War Events @ the Library

Past Civil War Events

In the keynote address for the Quindaro Symposium, held April 19-21 in Kansas City, Kansas, historian Quintard Taylor explores the history of the Quindaro region from 1855-65, and the nexus between border fighting and freedom for the enslaved.
Quintard Taylor
Thursday, April 19, 2018
Central Library
In the keynote address for the Quindaro Symposium, held April 19-21 in Kansas City, Kansas, historian Quintard Taylor explores the history of the Quindaro region from 1855-65, and the nexus between border fighting and freedom for the enslaved.
 
George Saunders discusses his best-selling Lincoln in the Bardo, winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize for Fiction for best original novel. The book movingly imagines Abraham Lincoln’s night in a cemetery, tortured by the loss of his son, the Civil War, and a ghostly world shared by Willie and his fellow dead.
George Saunders
Thursday, February 15, 2018
Plaza Branch

George Saunders discusses his best-selling Lincoln in the Bardo, winner of the 2017 Man Booker Prize for Fiction for best original novel. The book movingly imagines Abraham Lincoln’s night in a cemetery, tortured by the loss of his son, the Civil War, and a ghostly world shared by Willie and his fellow dead.

As part of the Indie Lens Pop-Up film series, the Library and KCPT–Kansas City PBS screen the documentary Tell Them We Are Rising, which charts the history and impact of our nation’s historically black colleges and universities. Local HBCU alumni lead a subsequent discussion.
Saturday, February 10, 2018
Plaza Branch
As part of the Indie Lens Pop-Up film series, the Library and KCPT–Kansas City PBS screen the documentary Tell Them We Are Rising, which charts the history and impact of our nation’s historically black colleges and universities. Local HBCU alumni lead a subsequent discussion.
 
Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States in large part by campaigning against the establishment. Now, author and conservative pundit Nick Adams says, the establishment is fighting back.
Nick Adams
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Plaza Branch
Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States in large part by campaigning against the establishment. Now, author and conservative pundit Nick Adams says, the establishment is fighting back.
Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.
Fred Kaplan
Wednesday, September 13, 2017
Plaza Branch
Was Abraham Lincoln the transcendent champion of African-American freedom that history books depict? Author Fred Kaplan tempers that image in a discussion of his book Lincoln and the Abolitionists: John Quincy Adams, Slavery, and the Civil War, casting Abe as a less fervent reformer than Adams and others of the time.
From Wild Bill Hickok’s gunfight on the Springfield square in 1865 to Bonnie and Clyde’s shootout with Joplin police in 1933, award-winning author Larry Wood examines the Ozarks’ preponderance of violent, murderous events from the 1860s until well into the 20th century.
Larry Wood
Sunday, June 25, 2017
Central Library
Infamous characters and sensational incidents abounded in the Ozarks immediately after the Civil War and well into the 20th century. The mining district around Joplin, Missouri, saw perhaps more murderous violence than any comparably populated area in the country. Gunplay erupted with alarming regularity, and spectators flocked to the drama of executions and lynchings.
 
Commemorating Juneteenth, Occidental College history professor Sharla M. Fett discusses her new book and a compelling chapter in the 19th-century march toward abolition: the journeys of slaves aboard illegal slave ships captured by the U.S. Navy and repatriated to Liberia.
Sharla M. Fett
Monday, June 19, 2017
Central Library
As part of the country’s celebration of Juneteenth, commemorating the end of slavery in the U.S., Occidental College history professor Sharla M. Fett examines a compelling chapter in the 19th-century march toward abolition.
 
In a discussion of her book White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, Emory University’s Carol Anderson addresses what she says is the root of today’s race problems in the U.S.: whites’ lack of acceptance of equal rights for African-Americans.
Carol Anderson
Thursday, February 23, 2017
Plaza Branch
The attention to so-called “black rage” during the 2014 rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, clouded what one historian says was the actual root of the unrest: more of the “white rage” that has punctuated our country’s history dating to the Civil War and emancipation.
 
In a discussion of her book, Park University historian Debra Sheffer examines early African-American military service – from colonial times through the era of the 19th-century Buffalo Soldier – and how it paved the way for black soldiers in future conflicts.
Debra Sheffer
Sunday, February 12, 2017
Central Library
African-Americans have served proudly in every great American war, including the Civil War, where their verve and valor led to the establishment of all-black regiments in 1866. These “Buffalo Soldiers” played a significant role in the military campaigns and settlement of the American West, and paved the way for African-American soldiers in future conflicts.
 
Acclaimed historian Peter Cozzens takes an evenhanded look at the bloody, post-Civil War struggle between whites and Native Americans, drawing from his new book The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West.
Peter Cozzens
Thursday, November 3, 2016
Plaza Branch

Historian Peter Cozzens offers an evenhanded look at that bloody struggle between whites and Native Americans, drawing from his new book The Earth Is Weeping: The Epic Story of the Indian Wars for the American West.

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